We Fight For Forests

Even if you live thousands of miles away from the nearest rainforest, they are essential to your survival. Rainforests truly are the lungs of our planet. They produce vital oxygen for all of us while providing homes for millions of people and some of the world’s most threatened and endangered animals.

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What we're fighting for

Palm OilPalm Oil Rainforest Free PulpRainforest Free Pulp Protect An AcreProtect An Acre Out of FashionOut of Fashion
Palm Oil

Are your cookies causing orangutan extinction? We may not be able to see it, but Conflict Palm Oil has become ubiquitous in our everyday lives. It is found in roughly half the packaged products sold in US grocery stores,

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Stay Updated with Forests

Publications

SF20report

Truth and Consequences: Palm Oil Plantations Push Unique Orangutan Population to Brink of Extinction

Ecological Catastrophe In the Tripa Rainforest of Sumatra

Turning The Page on Rainforest Destruction: Children's Books and the Future of Indonesia's Rainforests

Ironically, a growing number of these books are made from paper linked to the destruction of Indonesia’s rainforests.

American Dream, Native Nightmare: The Truth About Weyerhaeuser's "Green" Products and Homes

Clearcut logging continues within Grassy Narrows First Nation traditional territory despite decades of negotiation, protest, legal challenges and a clear lack of consent from the community

Corruption, Land Conflict & Forest Destruction: An Asia Pulp & Paper Case Study

After years of intensive selective logging, large numbers of logged-out forest concessions have closed or gone bankrupt.

Cargill's Legacy of Destruction: A Case Study of A Cargill Owned Plantation in Indonesia

HSL is one of the older palm plantations in Borneo; it was carved out of primary rainforest 17 years ago, in 1993.

Conflict Palm Oil Report

In Rainforests Half a World Away from the United States, Orangutans are Making their Last Stand for Survival.

The Truth Behind Tasmanian Forest Destruction and the Japanese Paper Industry: A Ranking Report

Australia’s Federal Court Recently Found their Practices to be Illegal in Wielangta Forest and Driving Endangered Species to Extinction.

Conflict Palm Oil in Practice: Exposing KLK's Role in Rainforest Destruction, Land Grabbing & Child Labor

Exposing KLK’s role in Rainforest Destruction, Land Grabbing and Child Labor

The Last Place on Earth Report, November 2014

Exposing the threats to the Leuser ecosystem. A global biodiversity hotspot deserving protection.

CONFLICT PALM OIL IN PRACTICE

Exposing KLK’s role in Rainforest Destruction, Land Grabbing and Child Labor

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Related Blog posts

Systems Change, Rainforests, and Racism

“What Does ______ Have to Do with Rainforests?!”This week, RAN posted a message of support on Facebook about the courageous civil disobedience by Bree Newsome in South Carolina. And, as a testament to the social justice leanings of our community, our post was met with predominant support. Post by rainforestactionnetwork.However, there was...

Conflict Palm Oil Demonstration at Nissin Foods US Headquarters

Nissin Foods is one of the Snack Food 20 companies in RAN’s Conflict Palm Oil Campaign, and is lagging far behind the rest of the group with a weak palm oil commitment that relies solely on the inadequate Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) certification system and lacks requirements for suppliers to end destruction of rainforests, peatlands and abuse of human and labor rights. We were headed to their offices to make sure that our campaign demands were seen and heard by the folks who work at the there.

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Palm Oil

Whats happening with Palm Oil

SF20: Cut Palm Oil, Not Rainforests

In rain forests half a world away from the United States, orangutans are making their last stand for survival. Scientists warn that these gentle and intelligent animals, among humankind’s closest kin, could become extinct within our lifetime if their rainforest homes continue to be destroyed for palm oil plantations. But the primary threat pushing them toward extinction lies much closer to home than you may think: you’ll find it hidden in the snack food aisle of your local grocery store, and likely in your own shopping cart.

TELL THE SNACK FOOD 20: DON'T REPLACE TRANS FATS WITH CONFLICT PALM OIL

Expansion of palm oil plantations into Indonesia’s and Malaysia's rainforests is causing massive climate disruption and pushing wild orangutans to the brink of extinction. We have reached The Last Stand of the Orangutan—but it's not too late. Take action now to call on the Snack Food 20—companies that control some of the best-known snack food brands in the world—to remove Conflict Palm Oil tied to rainforest destruction and orangutan extinction from their products. These companies rely on our trust as consumers. If enough of us speak up, the Snack Food 20 will have to change the way they do business.

Call on the Conflict Palm Oil Laggards

It’s been one year since we launched the campaign to cut Conflict Palm Oil from America’s snack foods. The good news is that with your help we are achieving real changes from many major companies, proving that not only is it possible for companies to change, but that people-powered pressure works to bring this change about. Unfortunately, there are still some critical companies that are refusing to take action to address their Conflict Palm Oil problem. Five of the worst offenders in the Conflict Palm Oil world - who are also some of biggest makers of popular kid’s snacks - won’t even acknowledge the destruction they’re causing.

Tell PepsiCo to Take the Conflict Palm Oil Challenge

In 2013, we launched the campaign to cut Conflict Palm Oil from America’s snack foods. The good news is that with your help we are achieving real changes from many major companies, proving that not only is it possible for companies to change, but that people-powered pressure works to bring this change about. The damage caused by Conflict Palm Oil is tremendous. Deforestation to make way for palm oil plantations threatens unique and priceless areas like the Leuser Ecosystem in Indonesia. It threatens species like the Sumatran rhino, orangutans, and sun bears. The impact on communities who are forced off their land or pushed into forced and child labor is simply unacceptable.

Tell Cargill to Eliminate Conflict Palm Oil

Cargill is buying palm oil from notorious Conflict Palm Oil producer Kuala Lumpur Kepong (KLK), which is engaged in everything from destruction of pristine rainforests to child labor and the theft of Indigenous peoples’ lands.

Turn Up The Heat on Pepsi

Instead of cutting Conflict Palm Oil from its products, PepsiCo continues to spend millions in advertising to push its darkly ironic #LiveForNow campaign. PepsiCo is telling people not to worry about climate change, the fate of the last wild orangutans and children that are forced to work in slave-like conditions on oil palm plantations and just #LiveForNow!

Pepsi Rapid Response

Want to take your online activism up a notch? Join @RAN's campaign demanding Pepsi cut Conflict Palm Oil here.

In Your Palm

We're collecting 60,600 names to send to 20 snack food companies using "Conflict Palm Oil" in their products, one for every known wild orangutan remaining. Tell the Snack Food 20 you don't want Conflict Palm Oil in your food!

Student Action Leaders

During the Fall 2014 semester, students in the Palm Oil Action Team are coming together to form a special group of Student Action Leaders to ramp up the pressure on PepsiCo.

PepsiCo Global Call-in Day - Sign Up!

Every day bulldozers drive deeper and deeper into the last stands of rainforests to meet the growing demand for Conflict Palm Oil. Conflict Palm Oil is used by companies like PepsiCo to make products, including snack foods. On December 9th, I'm joining thousands of activists around the world in a Global Call-in Day to demand that PepsiCo eliminate Conflict Palm Oil from its products for good. Will you make a call to save rainforests?

#ChangeQuaker in Snack Food Aisles Across America!

PepsiCo, and its brand Quaker, spends huge amounts of money on advertising every year, trying to convince moms and dads that Quaker is a brand that we can trust, yet they are unwilling to spend a few extra pennies to help save orangutans from extinction and keep children out of slave labor conditions.

Tell PepsiCo to Take the Conflict Palm Oil Challenge

In 2013, we launched the campaign to cut Conflict Palm Oil from America’s snack foods. The good news is that with your help we are achieving real changes from many major companies, proving that not only is it possible for companies to change, but that people-powered pressure works to bring this change about. The damage caused by Conflict Palm Oil is tremendous. Deforestation to make way for palm oil plantations threatens unique and priceless areas like the Leuser Ecosystem in Indonesia. It threatens species like the Sumatran rhino, orangutans, and sun bears. The impact on communities who are forced off their land or pushed into forced and child labor is simply unacceptable.

KLK case study

Around the world rogue palm oil companies are destroying rainforests and violating the rights of Indigenous Peoples, rural communities and workers in order to produce Conflict Palm Oil, which is finding its way into hundreds of products lining American supermarket aisles. Since 1990, palm oil production has risen nearly six-fold to become the world’s most widely used edible vegetable oil.

KLK Case Study 2014

Around the world rogue palm oil companies are destroying rainforests and violating the rights of indigenous Peoples, rural communities and workers in order to produce Conflict Palm Oil, which is finding its way into hundreds of products lining American supermarket aisles.

Fact Sheet - Rainforest Animals

Where can you find an antelope the size of a rabbit, a snake that can fly, or a spider that eats birds? All in tropical rainforests, of course! Tropical rainforests are home to the largest and the smallest, the loudest and the quietest of all land animals, as well as some of the most dangerous, most beautiful, most endearing and strangest looking animals on earth. You've probably heard of some of them: jaguars, toucans, parrots, gorillas, and tarantulas all make their home in tropical rainforests. But have you ever heard of the aye-aye? Or the okapi? There are so many fascinating animals in tropical rainforests that millions haven't been named or even identified yet. In fact, about half of all the earth's animal species live in tropical rainforests.

Indonesia’s Rainforests

Indonesia’s rainforests are one of earth’s most biologically and culturally rich landscapes. The world’s largest archipelago, Indonesia consists of almost 18,000 islands spanning between the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Containing the largest expanse of rainforest in all of Asia, it is home to hundreds of distinct Indigenous languages and over 3,000 animal species including Sumatran tigers, pygmy elephants, rhinoceros and orangutans.

Indonesia, Climate Change, and Rainforests

Indonesia is the world's largest archipelago - almost 18,000 islands spreading between the Pacific and the Indian Ocean. It's a hotspot of world diversity, home to hundreds of distinct cultures and over 3,000 animal species including Komodo dragons, Sumatran tigers and orangutans. Indonesia also houses the largest rainforest in all of Asia.

Indonesia’s Rainforests: Biodiversity and Endangered Species

Indonesia’s rainforests are home to some of the highest levels of biological diversity in the world. Many sources credit Indonesia as the most species rich country on earth. Spread over 18,000 islands, Indonesia contains the world’s third largest area of rainforest after the Amazon and Africa’s Congo Basin.

Palm Oil Fact Sheet

Palm oil is a globally traded agricultural commodity that is used in 50 percent of all consumer goods, from lipstick and packaged food to body lotion and biofuels.[1] Used in about half of the products on supermarket shelves, palm oil imports to the U.S. have jumped 485% in the last decade, [2]pushing palm oil cultivation into the rainforests and making this crop one of the key causes of rainforest destruction around the globe. Approximately 85 percent of palm oil is grown in the tropical countries of Indonesia, Malaysia and Papua New Guinea (PNG) on industrial plantations [3] that have severe impacts on the environment, forest peoples and the climate.

Last Stand of the Orangutan

Rainforests are being destroyed for palm oil and pushing the last wild orangutans to the brink of extinction. At Rainforest Action Network our goal is to collect 60,600 photo petitions - that's one person for each orangutan remaining in the wild. We’ll deliver these photos to the Snack Food 20, the top snack food companies that are using this Conflict Palm Oil in our food.

Palm Oil

Are your cookies causing orangutan extinction? We may not be able to see it, but Conflict Palm Oil has become ubiquitous in our everyday lives. It is found in roughly half the packaged products sold in US grocery stores,

View More

Rainforest Free Pulp

Whats happening with Rainforest Free Pulp

Corruption, Land Conflict, and Forest Destruction: APP Case Study from Sumatra

Asia Pulp and Paper (APP), Indonesia and China's biggest pulp and paper company, is rapidly clear cutting and draining huge areas of Indonesia's diverse rainforests and peatlands. The logging giant then converts the degraded land into monoculture acacia pulp wood plantations to make cheap paper products. This deforestation is devastating communities and their livelihoods and driving species like the Sumatran tiger toward extinction. Despite government issued permits, serious legal uncertainties remain concerning APP's business.

Don’t Bag Indonesia’s Rainforests

In November 2009 the prestigious conglomerate of fashion and luxury brands Gucci Group decided to eliminate all paper made from Indonesian rainforests and plantations and from controversial suppliers like Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). The move was a first step in implementing an industry-leading paper policy and a continuation of the Gucci Group’s interest in stemming climate change, over fifteen percent of which comes from forest loss.

Rainforest Free Paper

When taking a birds-eye view of the three major tropical rainforests in the world, Southeast Asia’s rainforests, and those found in Indonesia in particular, are ground zero for climate change, biodiversity loss, and exploitation of forest peoples. Containing the largest expanse of rainforest in all of Asia, Indonesian rainforests are home to hundreds of distinct Indigenous languages and over 3,000 animal species including critically endangered Sumatran tigers, pygmy elephants, java rhinoceros and orangutans. As recently as the 1960s, about 80 percent of Indonesia was forested, but with one of the highest deforestation rates in the world, less than half of the Indonesia’s original forest cover remains. Although estimates vary, conservative studies suggest more than a million hectares (2.4 million acres) of Indonesian rainforest is cleared and lost each year, with about 70% occurring in forests on mineral soils and 30% on carbon-rich peatland forests. The scale of destruction of Indonesia’s rainforests is having globally significant impacts on the climate system. Rainforest and peatland ecosystems store billions of tons of carbon, and their destruction releases huge emissions into the atmosphere. Indonesia is now the world’s third largest emitter of greenhouse gasses after the U.S. and China. However, unlike these nations over whose emissions is largely due to burning fossil fuels 80% of Indonesia’s emissions profile is from rainforest and peatland degradation and loss.

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Protect-An-Acre

Whats happening with Protect-An-Acre

Elang

Palm oil plantations are expanding into the planet’s most biodiverse ecosystems, including the rainforests, grasslands and peat swamps of South America, Southeast Asia, the Pacific and Africa. Transforming ecosystems into monocultural palm oil plantations is devastating local and Indigenous communities and contributing heavily to climate change.

WHAT IS PROTECT-AN-ACRE?

Since 1993, RAN’s Protect-an-Acre program (PAA) has distributed more than one million dollars in grants to more than 150 frontline communities, Indigenous-led organizations, and allies, helping their efforts to secure protection for millions of acres of traditional territory in forests around the world.

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Out of Fashion

Whats happening with Out of Fashion

A Missed Opportunity for Ralph Lauren

Ralph Lauren's citizenship report represents a small step for the company, but it lacks the specificity to protect forests and communities in a meaningful way. Demand a real policy here.

Forest-Friendly Alternative Fabrics

At RAN, it isn’t our place to tell you what fabrics to buy. Really. All fabrics have impacts, and we aren’t experts in every fabric out there. What we believe is that clothing companies should trace their supply chains, eliminate controversial fiber and suppliers, create policies to ensure they never purchase controversial fiber again, and -- ideally -- join us in the fight to make their industry more sustainable.

Sign the petition: Big Fashion is grinding up forests to make clothes. Demand change.

Sign the petition: Big Fashion is grinding up forests to make clothes. Demand change.

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We Fight For Forests

Even if you live thousands of miles away from the nearest rainforest, they are essential to your survival. 

Rainforests truly are the lungs of our planet. They produce vital oxygen for all of us while providing homes for millions of people and some of the world’s most threatened and endangered animals.

Despite the fact that we all rely on rainforests, we are currently losing an acre every second for commodities like palm oil, cattle, biofuels, soya, wood and paper. 

But ecologically and culturally significant rainforests still remain, which means we have the opportunity to be the generation that makes sure it stays that way. But we must take immediate action. 

Right now, the rainforests facing the most urgent threats are in Indonesia and Malaysia. Horrifyingly, Indonesia ranks third in total global greenhouse emissions--behind China and the United States--due to the uncontrolled clearing and burning of its rainforests and peatlands. If we don’t mount an all out effort to protect Indonesia’s forest landscapes, we will not only see climate emissions continue to skyrocket but we will lose unique cultures and livelihoods and irreplaceable animals like the orangutan forever.

So what can you do to help protect rainforests?

The leading cause of deforestation and land grabs in Indonesia is clearing and plantation development for palm oil production and pulp and paper. These commodities are being produced to feed international demand. In many cases, we are the customers being sold paper and palm oil-laced foods and other products fueling the loss of Indonesia’s forests. This means that working together we have power to change the situation. We are having real influence on the big corporate consumers of these products and they, in turn, are requiring changes to their suppliers’ policies and practices.

From Disney to Home Depot, RAN has helped leverage your voices to convince some of the world’s largest companies to change the way they do business for the better--and with your help we will do it again.

RAN’s palm oil and pulp and paper campaigns are designed to help you apply pressure on the global brands that are influencing the companies causing the most damage to Indonesia’s rainforests and forest communities.

What’s our goal? We believe the two most important things we need to do to protect Indonesia’s critical rainforests are:

  • Support the rights of Indigenous and rural communities and local organizations to steward the forests they know best; and

  • Build a movement of customer power that transforms the practices of the giant global companies responsible for this deforestation mess.

All of that can only happen if you join us. When we speak out together brands listen — carefully.

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  • commented 2014-10-23 05:44:34 -0700
    This message is so important, save the forests!

    We have also started a campaign to reduce the use of wooden garden furniture.

    If you would like to reference it, share this page (http://blog.gardencentreshopping.co.uk/save-the-forests/) or tweet #savetheforests.
  • commented 2014-07-16 23:38:16 -0700
    Where is the site “Search” button?