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Palm Oil: Where to From Here?

As Rainforest Action Network’s palm oil campaigners wrap up a full, fast and furious week here at the 12th annual gathering of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, we can’t help but reflect a bit on this pivotal moment. This dispatch is meant to shed some light on what we see next for the responsible palm oil movement.  Let’s be real: palm oil plantations are directly descended from a colonial model that requires artificially cheap (read: stolen) land and artificially cheap (read: slave) labor to be profitable,...

The Page Pepsi Doesn't Want You To See

For over a year, Rainforest Action Network and our allies have been calling on PepsiCo to cut Conflict Palm Oil from its supply chain. The reason is simple: with an annual usage of 457,200 metric tons of palm oil, what Pepsi does has a huge impact on the climate, the rainforests of Southeast Asia, and the people and animals that rely on these forests for their lives and livelihoods.  Pepsi could be a leader in sustainability, could rise above its competitors and do the right thing, but instead it has relied on half measures and a commitment with gaps big...

No Means No. KLK Out of Collingwood Bay!

This message comes from Adelbert Gangai and George Baure of Collingwood Bay, Papua New Guinea. They are two of many local residents fiercely resisting KLK's attempted landgrab of the community's forests. Our names are Adelbert Gangai and George Baure. We are calling on you today from the tribes of Collingwood Bay, Papua New Guinea, to ask you to take action to support us in defending our land from destruction by the palm oil giant KLK. Our villages are spread across a pristine stretch of isolated coastline backed by vast mountains and valleys covered in some of the most lush and biodiverse rainforest...

  • 11/18/14
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Southern Forests Aren't Fuel

Big energy corporations are clearcutting forests throughout the Southeast United States, chopping the trees into pellets and shipping them to Europe to be burned for fuel. Tell E.U. policymakers to Save Our Southern forests! 

World’s Top Coal-Financing Banks Still Won’t Touch Abbot Point

      This week, BankTrack launched their latest report on the top coal-financing banks in the world. The ranking, topped by JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup, includes several other U.S. banks in the top 20 based on their total financing for coal mining and coal-fired power since 2005.   As the piece we’ve cross-posted below notes, it’s telling that even the top financiers of coal in the world have decided to stay away the proposed coal terminal expansion at Abbot Point on the Great Barrier Reef. But unfortunately, even though most of their competitors have concluded that expanding Abbot Point would be a disaster for the climate and the reef, Bank of America still hasn’t gotten the message. By Ben Collins (RAN), Yann Louvel (BankTrack) and Julien...

Tell Bank of America: Don't Finance the Destruction of the Great Barrier Reef

The coal industry is trying to move forward with a deal that would threaten Australia’s treasured Great Barrier Reef and turbocharge climate change—but they can’t do it without major financial backing. Three of the biggest Wall Street investment banks have said they won’t fund the deal.1 But Bank of America won’t commit to staying away. Tell Bank of America—don’t finance the destruction of the Great Barrier Reef! Right now, the coal industry is pushing an incredibly destructive plan: to build out one of the biggest coal ports in the world right in the middle of the Great Barrier Reef. A huge corporation called Adani is attempting to dredge 3 million cubic meters of seabed, wrecking part of the biggest stretch of coral reef in the world and one of the planet’s most biodiverse ecosystems.  The Great Barrier Reef...

RAN to Bank of America: Don’t Bankroll Reef Destruction

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 28, 2014   contact: Claire Sandberg, claire@ran.org, 646-641-6431   RAN to Bank of America: Don’t Bankroll Reef Destruction Australian coal port threatens global climate, Great Barrier Reef   San Francisco—Rainforest Action Network (RAN) called on Bank of America to rule out financing the controversial Abbot Point coal port in Queensland, Australia, a day after three major U.S. investment banks pledged to steer clear of the project. Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, and Goldman Sachs all assured RAN in writing that they would not finance the expansion of Abbot Point, but Bank of America has so far refused to take a position. The project would significantly harm the Great Barrier Reef--construction of the new port would require dredging part of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage area--and would drive global climate change by drastically increasing carbon emissions. Earlier this year, Bank...

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Palm Oil: Where to From Here?

As Rainforest Action Network’s palm oil campaigners wrap up a full, fast and furious week here at the 12th annual gathering of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, we can’t help but reflect a bit on this pivotal moment. This dispatch is meant to shed some light on what we see next for the responsible palm oil movement.  Let’s be real: palm oil plantations are directly descended from a colonial model that requires artificially cheap (read: stolen) land and artificially cheap (read: slave) labor to be profitable,...

The Page Pepsi Doesn't Want You To See

For over a year, Rainforest Action Network and our allies have been calling on PepsiCo to cut Conflict Palm Oil from its supply chain. The reason is simple: with an annual usage of 457,200 metric tons of palm oil, what Pepsi does has a huge impact on the climate, the rainforests of Southeast Asia, and the people and animals that rely on these forests for their lives and livelihoods.  Pepsi could be a leader in sustainability, could rise above its competitors and do the right thing, but instead it has relied on half measures and a commitment with gaps big...

No Means No. KLK Out of Collingwood Bay!

This message comes from Adelbert Gangai and George Baure of Collingwood Bay, Papua New Guinea. They are two of many local residents fiercely resisting KLK's attempted landgrab of the community's forests. Our names are Adelbert Gangai and George Baure. We are calling on you today from the tribes of Collingwood Bay, Papua New Guinea, to ask you to take action to support us in defending our land from destruction by the palm oil giant KLK. Our villages are spread across a pristine stretch of isolated coastline backed by vast mountains and valleys covered in some of the most lush and biodiverse rainforest...

  • 11/18/14
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PepsiCo Global Call-in Day - Sign Up!

Every day bulldozers drive deeper and deeper into the last stands of rainforests to meet the growing demand for Conflict Palm Oil. Conflict Palm Oil is used by companies like PepsiCo to make products, including snack foods. On December 9th, I'm joining thousands of activists around the world in a Global Call-in Day to demand that PepsiCo eliminate Conflict Palm Oil from its products for good. Will you make a call to save rainforests?

Southern Forests Aren't Fuel

Big energy corporations are clearcutting forests throughout the Southeast United States, chopping the trees into pellets and shipping them to Europe to be burned for fuel. Tell E.U. policymakers to Save Our Southern forests! 

Long Live the Leuser Ecosystem

Of all the special places on earth that are deserving of protection, there is one in particular—Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem on the north tip of Sumatra—that Rainforest Action Network has decided to double down and defend, and we hope you will join us to do so too. At 6.5 million acres, the Leuser Ecosystem is a world unto itself—a rich and verdant expanse of intact tropical lowland rainforests, cloud draped mountains and steamy peat swamps. It is among the most biodiverse and ancient ecosystems ever documented by science, and it is the last place where orangutans, elephants, tigers, rhinos and sun bears still roam side by side. But the Leuser Ecosystem exists at a tenuous crossroads. Despite being protected under Indonesian national law, massive industrial development for palm oil, pulp and paper plantations and mining threaten the entire ecosystem, as well as the continued wellbeing of...

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Southern Forests Aren't Fuel

Big energy corporations are clearcutting forests throughout the Southeast United States, chopping the trees into pellets and shipping them to Europe to be burned for fuel. Tell E.U. policymakers to Save Our Southern forests!  Forests aren’t fuel. But biomass companies are cutting down whole trees to burn in European power plants. This scourge is huge, and it’s growing. From Louisiana to Virginia, there are 20 wood pellet facilities up and running, and 33 more being proposed.1 Wood pellet exports from the U.S. doubled last year, from...

RAN Applauds Move by U.S. Banks to Reject Australian Coal Port

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEOctober 27, 2014contact:Claire Sandberg, claire@ran.org, 646-641-6431Rainforest Action Network Applauds Move by U.S. Banks to Reject Australian Coal PortAbbot Point coal export project presents dire threat to climate and to the Great Barrier Reef San Francisco—Rainforest Action Network commended the move by leading U.S. investment banks to rule out financing the Abbot Point coal export project in Queensland, Australia. Under pressure from RAN, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, and JPMorgan Chase all issued written commitments—released publicly for the first time today—to not bankroll the controversial project, which would involve dredging part of the Great Barrier Reef. “We’re pleased to see some of the biggest banks on Wall Street reject this destructive project that presents a grave threat to the Great Barrier Reef and to the global climate,” said RAN Climate and Energy Program Director Amanda Starbuck. “These banks have clearly taken a good look at the Abbot Point...

Wall Street: Don't Destroy the Great Barrier Reef!

In the coming months, big Wall Street banks could finance the destruction of the Great Barrier Reef. Raise your voice to stop them!  Photo: Shutterstock The Great Barrier Reef, off the coast of Australia, is the world's biggest stretch of coral reef and is probably the planet’s richest area in terms of animal diversity. It’s home to 1,500 species of fish, 400 kinds of coral, and at least 30 types of whales and dolphins—it’s an important area for humpback whales giving birth and raising their young. The reef is also a key habitat for two endangered—and beautiful—species: the green sea turtle and the dugong, or “sea cow.” And it’s a global treasure, a protected UNESCO World Heritage Site.1 Now the Great Barrier Reef is facing a massive threat. A huge corporation, Adani, wants to expand the...

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Palm Oil: Where to From Here?

Posted by 11/20/14

As Rainforest Action Network’s palm oil campaigners wrap up a full, fast and furious week here at the 12th annual gathering of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, we can’t help but reflect a bit on this pivotal moment. This dispatch is meant to shed some light on what we see next for the responsible palm oil movement.  Let’s be real: palm oil plantations are directly descended from a colonial model that requires artificially cheap (read: stolen) land and artificially cheap (read: slave) labor to be profitable, or at least to be as wildly profitable as it has proven to be. This industrial-scale, scorched-earth style of agriculture has now been violently imposed upon tens of millions of people across millions of acres of forest in Indonesia and Malaysia and is now aggressively seeking to expand into primary...   Read more

Leading Manufacturers and Retailers Announce support for Palm Oil Innovation Group

Posted by 11/19/14

  Joint Press Statement 20th November 2014 Leading Manufacturers and Retailers Announce support for Palm Oil Innovation Group Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - Five of the world’s leading consumer goods manufacturers and retailers today announce their support to drive the transformation of their sector towards responsible palm oil production and sourcing. Ferrero, REWE Group, EDEKA, Boulder Brands and Stephenson have all announced their support for the Palm Oil Innovation Group (POIG), by joining NGOs and palm oil producers seeking to break the link between palm oil and deforestation, social conflict and carbon emissions. Growing support amongst buyers of palm oil shows a pressing need for the palm oil industry to innovate and meet the new global benchmark for responsible palm oil. Each of these five companies is looking forward to work with NGOs and leading palm oil producers to find solutions to complex supply chain challenges and...   Read more

The Page Pepsi Doesn't Want You To See

Posted by 11/19/14

For over a year, Rainforest Action Network and our allies have been calling on PepsiCo to cut Conflict Palm Oil from its supply chain. The reason is simple: with an annual usage of 457,200 metric tons of palm oil, what Pepsi does has a huge impact on the climate, the rainforests of Southeast Asia, and the people and animals that rely on these forests for their lives and livelihoods.  Pepsi could be a leader in sustainability, could rise above its competitors and do the right thing, but instead it has relied on half measures and a commitment with gaps big enough to drive a bulldozer through. Activists have responded by increasing our pressure on Pepsi, with a global Day of Action this spring, events across the US this summer, and an active online push that's ongoing. We're organizing a Global Call-In Day on December 9th that you can...   Read more

No Means No. KLK Out of Collingwood Bay!

Posted by 11/18/14

This message comes from Adelbert Gangai and George Baure of Collingwood Bay, Papua New Guinea. They are two of many local residents fiercely resisting KLK's attempted landgrab of the community's forests. Our...   Read more

Major Importer IOI Falls Short in Latest Pledge to Eliminate Conflict Palm Oil

Posted by 11/13/14

Despite sector movement toward more responsible palm oil production, IOI Loders Croklaan new policy does not cover all IOI Group’s plantations and operations. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday, November 14, 2014 CONTACT: Christopher J. Herrera, 510.290.5282, Christopher@ran.org San Francisco, CA – Responding to mounting pressure from large corporate customers, consumers and environmental and social justice organizations, IOI Loders Croklaan announced new palm oil commitments today. IOI Loders Croklaan has stated its intention to eliminate palm oil in its supply chain that is associated with deforestation, degradation of carbon-rich peatlands or failure to protect Indigenous and other human and worker rights.   IOI Loders Croklaan is a major importer of palm oil into the United States. Its parent company IOI Group has large plantation holdings in Malaysia and Indonesia, as well as sourcing from third-party suppliers. Unlike other leading palm oil traders, Wilmar and Golden Agri Resources, IOI has yet to...  Read more

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