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Tell Bank of America: Don't Finance the Destruction of the Great Barrier Reef

The coal industry is trying to move forward with a deal that would threaten Australia’s treasured Great Barrier Reef and turbocharge climate change—but they can’t do it without major financial backing. Three of the biggest Wall Street investment banks have said they won’t fund the deal.1 But Bank of America won’t commit to staying away. Tell Bank of America—don’t finance the destruction of the Great Barrier Reef! Right now, the coal industry is pushing an incredibly destructive plan: to build out one of the biggest coal ports in...

RAN to Bank of America: Don’t Bankroll Reef Destruction

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 28, 2014   contact: Claire Sandberg, claire@ran.org, 646-641-6431   RAN to Bank of America: Don’t Bankroll Reef Destruction Australian coal port threatens global climate, Great Barrier Reef   San Francisco—Rainforest Action Network (RAN) called on Bank of America to rule out financing the controversial Abbot Point coal port in Queensland, Australia, a day after three major U.S. investment banks pledged to steer clear of the project. Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, and Goldman Sachs all assured RAN in writing that they would not finance the expansion of Abbot Point, but Bank...

RAN Applauds Move by U.S. Banks to Reject Australian Coal Port

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEOctober 27, 2014contact:Claire Sandberg, claire@ran.org, 646-641-6431Rainforest Action Network Applauds Move by U.S. Banks to Reject Australian Coal PortAbbot Point coal export project presents dire threat to climate and to the Great Barrier Reef San Francisco—Rainforest Action Network commended the move by leading U.S. investment banks to rule out financing the Abbot Point coal export project in Queensland, Australia. Under pressure from RAN, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, and JPMorgan Chase all issued written commitments—released publicly for the first time today—to not bankroll the controversial project, which would involve dredging part of the Great Barrier Reef. “We’re pleased...

One Step Closer: Saving the Leuser Ecosystem

This week an important milestone was reached in the effort to save portions of the precious Leuser Ecosytsem in Indonesia. Covering over 6 million acres of intact lowland and mountainous rainforests The Leuser is considered by many scientists and conservationists to be among the most important forests left in Southeast Asia.  It is home to the densest population of orangutans left anywhere, and is the last place on earth where orangutans, tigers, elephants, rhinos and sun bears share the same habitat. This fragile and irreplaceable ecosystem and the extraordinary life it supports are imminently threatened by industrial development. One of the biggest threats has been the expansion of illegal palm oil plantations within the boundaries of the Leuser Protected Ecosystem. However, local organizations and communities have been fighting back by working to physically remove 25,000 acres of illegal plantations from within the boundaries of Leuser. The...

REVEL = FOMO

For those of you who don’t know what REVEL is, it is a night of revelry to celebrate the year’s accomplishments at Rainforest Action Network. It is a night where friends gather, where new friends are made, and where activism meets exhilaration.  For years, REVEL has hosted environmentalists, community leaders, artists, film-makers, game-changers, inventors, superstars and happy agitators -- those committed individuals who are not afraid to challenge the status quo in order to change the world for the better. You can expect REVEL to be the greenest party of the year. You can expect gourmet vegan food, premium tequila flights, and dancing to fantastic live music by Monophonics. You can expect to get free silk screening (just bring an old t-shirt or a make an optional donation for a new shirt). Best of all, you can expect the “Right to Remain Silent Auction”...

Challenging Corporate Power at the Biggest Climate March in History

This post is by the RAN staff who were in New York as part of the People's Climate March: Lindsey Allen, Ginger Cassady, Susana Cervantes, Adrienne Fitch-Frankel, Chelsea Matthews, Scott Parkin, Claire Sandberg, Amanda Starbuck, Laurel Sutherlin, Emm Talarico, Christy Tennery-Spalding and Todd Zimmer.  Wow, these past few days have been an exhausting and exhilarating whirlwind of activity and activism here in New York City. As world leaders gathered yesterday for the UN Climate Summit, much of RAN’s staff and network was recovering from back to back, power-packed days of nonstop organizing, training, marching, meeting, movement building and risking arrest to challenge corporate power at the heart of the global financial system. You’ve likely heard the superlatives. Sunday’s People’s Climate March was the largest demonstration for climate action in history, with more than 400,000 people — from all walks of life and all over the country and across the world — joining together in...

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Long Live the Leuser Ecosystem

Of all the special places on earth that are deserving of protection, there is one in particular—Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem on the north tip of Sumatra—that Rainforest Action Network has decided to double down and defend, and we hope you will join us to do so too. At 6.5 million acres, the Leuser Ecosystem is a world unto itself—a rich and verdant expanse of intact tropical lowland rainforests, cloud draped mountains and steamy peat swamps. It is among the most biodiverse and ancient ecosystems ever documented by science, and it is the last place where orangutans, elephants,...

An Ode to Real Food

This week over five thousand colorful events are taking place in communities across the country to celebrate National Food Day, a project of Center for Science and the Public Interest (CSPI). National Food Day mobilizes...

Tell KLK to Leave Collingwood Bay Now!

This guest blog has been authored by Lester Seri of Collingwood Bay, Papua New Guinea. He is one of many local residents fiercely resisting KLK's attempted landgrab of the community's forests.   My name is Lester Seri, and I am a Maisin landowner in Collingwood Bay, Papua New Guinea. I come from the Wofun Clan, belonging to the Wo Ari Kawo tribe, and I have been mandated by the Wo Ari Kawo Elders to speak on behalf of them on Tribal land matters. I am writing to you today because the people of Collingwood Bay urgently need you to support our struggle.  My people - the Maisin people - along with our neighboring communities in Collingwood Bay have been fighting to protect our customary lands from illegal land grabs for logging and palm oil development for...

Naming Names: Forest Destroyers for Clothing

A few weeks ago, RAN announced its newest campaign, Out of Fashion, a campaign for forest-friendly fabric. Currently, some of the biggest names in fashion are responsible for the pulping of pristine forests for clothing. The destruction of these forests creates a ripple effect: human rights abuses, land grabbing, habitat and biodiversity loss, climate disruption and toxics pollution. Dissolving pulp, which is spun into thread and woven into fabric, appears on clothing racks as rayon, viscose, Tencel, lyocell, and modal.  RAN is working to expose this destructive practice, and transform the supply chains of some of the most popular brands and we need your help. Are you in for a little guerrilla activism? Sign up here for your (free) stickering kit and take action to eliminate forest destruction in our clothing.  We know that it’s possible for companies to change and avoid this...

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Wall Street: Don't Destroy the Great Barrier Reef!

In the coming months, big Wall Street banks could finance the destruction of the Great Barrier Reef. Raise your voice to stop them!  Photo: Shutterstock The Great Barrier Reef, off the coast of Australia, is the world's biggest stretch of coral reef and is probably the planet’s richest area in terms of animal diversity. It’s home to 1,500 species of fish, 400 kinds of coral, and at least 30 types of whales and dolphins—it’s an important area for humpback whales giving birth and raising their young....

Challenging Corporate Power at the Biggest Climate March in History

This post is by the RAN staff who were in New York as part of the People's Climate March: Lindsey Allen, Ginger Cassady, Susana Cervantes, Adrienne Fitch-Frankel, Chelsea Matthews, Scott Parkin, Claire Sandberg, Amanda Starbuck, Laurel Sutherlin, Emm Talarico, Christy Tennery-Spalding and Todd Zimmer.  Wow, these past few days have been an exhausting and exhilarating whirlwind of activity and activism here in New York City. As world leaders gathered yesterday for the UN Climate Summit, much of RAN’s staff and network was recovering from back to back, power-packed days of nonstop organizing, training, marching, meeting, movement building and risking arrest to challenge corporate...

RAN responds to the UN Climate Summit 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014 CONTACT: Laurel Sutherlin, 415.246.0161 Laurel@ran.org | Bill Barclay, 415. 659. 0512 BBarclay@ran.org | Christopher Herrera Christopher@ran.org The past few days have been exhilarating as hundreds of thousands of people around the globe display their insistence and commitments to tackling the imminent...

Challenge Corporate Power in the streets of NYC

Early Sunday morning RAN joined the hundreds of thousands of people making their voice heard world wide. RAN's message of the day was Challenge Corporate Power! Prepping the #ChallengeCorporatePower bloc! #PeoplesClimate @RAN pic.twitter.com/OmM0hkjOBH —...

People's Climate March Logistics in NYC

The air is thick with excitement and people-power as thousands and thousands are heading to New York to join in the People’s Climate March on Sunday.   Rainforest Action Network staff and friends will be organizing the “Challenge Corporate Power” contingent at the march to...

  • 09/20/14
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Be a Part of the Biggest Climate March in History

On September 21, New York City will see the biggest climate march in history. Be a part of it! You know the deadly effects of climate change: more storms like Superstorm Sandy in New York, and Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. More droughts like the one right now in California, and fires like the ones that have been engulfing the Western U.S. every summer. Farmland drying up and sea levels rising, which means hunger and displacement for many of the world’s poorest people. Now more than ever, we need to show decision-makers that climate change is a planetary emergency, and that we can't wait any longer for serious action to stop climate chaos. That's why next month, when President Obama and other world leaders gather for a crucial climate summit at the United Nations, the global climate movement will greet them with the largest climate...

You Did It! No U.S. Tax Dollars for Dirty Coal Plants Abroad!

We did it! We’ve won the first round in a fight against using U.S. tax dollars to finance the dirtiest coal projects around the world, thanks to an outpouring of opposition from environmental activists, including RAN members. West Virginia Senator and “mouthpiece for the coal industry” Joe Manchin had sought to include a giveaway to Big Coal in legislation reauthorizing the federal Export-Import Bank. But Manchin backed down in the face of mounting pressure earlier this week, instead introducing a “clean” bill without the coal industry goodies. This is big step in the right direction. Pushing public banks to scale back funding for coal is critical to Rainforest Action Network’s long-term goal of preventing the entire financial sector from bankrolling climate chaos. Public sector financing is one of the few areas on climate where the...

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Building Labor's Power to Stop Exploitation of Palm Oil Workers

Posted by 11/17/14

Petaling Jaya, Malaysia - RAN just finished hosting an inspiring and humbling two-day Palm Oil Labor Principles Workshop outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The intensive discussions involved dozens of representatives from international environmental and labor NGOs alongside labor unions, worker advocacy and human rights organizations from across Indonesia and Malaysia.   The purpose of the workshop was to build consensus for a widely agreed upon standard for fair labor principles in the palm oil sector. When complete, this detailed set of standards will be delivered as a set of recommendations to help guide companies, plantation certification bodies and government regulators towards eliminating systemic abuses currently rife throughout the palm oil industry.  Participants shared heart-wrenching stories of severe health impacts from being forced to apply highly toxic chemical pesticides like paraquat, without proper protective equipment or training, especially among women. Workers spoke of widespread...   Read more

Labor Exploitation and Human Rights Abuses within the Palm Oil Sector

Posted by 11/17/14

Workshop builds consensus for a common set of palm oil labor principles for companies, certifiers and governments  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - This week, a group of international NGOs convened with dozens of representatives from labor unions, worker advocacy and human rights organizations from across Indonesia and Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, for the second Palm Oil Labor Principles Workshop. The purpose of the workshop is to build consensus for a widely agreed upon standard for fair labor principles in the palm oil sector. When complete, this detailed set of standards will be delivered as a set of recommendations to help guide companies, plantation certification bodies and government regulators towards eliminating the systemic abuses currently rife throughout the palm oil industry. The workshop occurred in advance of the annual meeting of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), taking place November 17-20 in Malaysia. Key issues to be...   Read more

Major Importer IOI Falls Short in Latest Pledge to Eliminate Conflict Palm Oil

Posted by 11/13/14

Despite sector movement toward more responsible palm oil production, IOI Loders Croklaan new policy does not cover all IOI Group’s plantations and operations. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday, November 14, 2014 CONTACT: Christopher J. Herrera, 510.290.5282, Christopher@ran.org San Francisco, CA – Responding to mounting pressure from large corporate customers, consumers and environmental and social justice organizations, IOI Loders Croklaan announced new palm oil commitments today. IOI Loders Croklaan has stated its intention to eliminate palm oil in its supply chain that is associated with deforestation, degradation of carbon-rich peatlands or failure to protect Indigenous and other human and worker rights.   IOI Loders Croklaan is a major importer of palm oil into the United States. Its parent company IOI Group has large plantation holdings in Malaysia and Indonesia, as well as sourcing from third-party suppliers. Unlike other leading palm oil traders, Wilmar and Golden Agri Resources, IOI has yet to...   Read more

Southern Forests Aren't Fuel

Posted by 11/13/14

Big energy corporations are clearcutting forests throughout the Southeast United States, chopping the trees into pellets and shipping them to Europe to be burned for fuel. Tell E.U. policymakers...   Read more

Long Live the Leuser Ecosystem

Posted by 11/11/14

Of all the special places on earth that are deserving of protection, there is one in particular—Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem on the north tip of Sumatra—that Rainforest Action Network has...   Read more

All Eyes on PepsiCo: Will it Come Clean or Keep Trafficking Conflict Palm Oil?

Posted by 11/10/14

PepsiCo is the largest globally distributed snack food company in the world and is a major user of Conflict Palm Oil. But it continues to fall farther and farther behind its peers by refusing to close major gaps in its commitments and adopt a truly responsible palm oil policy.PepsiCo uses an immense amount of palm oil, enough palm oil every year to fill Pepsi cans full of it to circle the earth four times at the equator. Put another way, the tropical land base needed to feed PepsiCo’s global appetite for palm oil each year is a quarter million acres of land, most of which used to be rainforest. PepsiCo’s customers around the planet have clearly communicated their demands for the company to take action, and its peers – including half of the Snack Food 20 companies targeted by RAN - have shown it can be done. The only thing...  Read more

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