Pages tagged "solar"


RAN's Pictures of the Month: July

July was another busy month over at RAN's Facebook page!

Here's a look at the month's most popular pictures.

3. The Bronze Panther for Third Most Popular Picture goes to ... 

Extinction.jpg

... these adorable (and threatened) orangutans.

Tell the Snack Food 20 to cut conflict palm oil, not rainforests: http://www.ran.org/snack_food_20

2. The Silver Panther for Second Most Popular Picture goes to ...  

MLK.png

... the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., reminding us what Independence Day really means

1. And the Gold Panther for Most Popular Picture goes to ... 

Edison.png

... Thomas Edison! This picture definitely stirred up some controversy over his business practices, and his treatment of Nicola Tesla—but he was right about the potential of solar power. 

Like us on Facebook for great pictures every day!


Solar Power Had A Huge Year In 2013

800px-Solar_Plant_klThis post originally appeared on DeSmogBlog. A new report out from GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) shows that solar power came an incredibly long way toward asserting itself as a key part of the U.S. energy mix last year. The U.S. now has a total of 12.1 gigawatts of photovoltaic (PV) installations and 918 megawatts of concentrating solar power (CSP), enough to power 2.2 million homes. Here are some of the other highlights from the Solar Market Insight Year in Review 2013 report: • PV installations increased 41% over 2012 to reach 4,751 MW; these new installations have a $13.7 billion market value. • 410 MW of CSP came online in 2013, increasing total capacity in the U.S. more than 80%. • Solar accounted for 29% of all new electricity generating capacity, making it the second-largest source, exceeded only by natural gas. • The cost to install solar fell throughout the year, reaching a new low of $2.59/W in the fourth quarter and ending 15 percent below the mark set at the end of 2012. But these statistics don't tell the whole story. “Perhaps more important than the numbers,” says Shayle Kann, Senior Vice President at GTM Research, “2013 offered the U.S. solar market the first real glimpse of its path toward mainstream status. The combination of rapid customer adoption, grassroots support for solar, improved financing terms, and public market successes displayed clear gains for solar in the eyes of both the general population and the investment community.” There's certainly something to Kann's claim that solar is on track to become mainstream, and some facts in the report bear this assertion out. While California continues to lead the way, installing more than half of new solar energy generating capacity in 2013 (some 2,261 MW), red states Arizona and North Carolina were the second and third top states (421 MW and 335 MW, respectively). Given that political polarization and obstructionism have stalled progress on a number of important issues in recent American history, the fact that solar is appealing to folks on all ends of the political spectrum may speak more to solar's bright future than anything else.

A New Kind Of Co-Op: Ending Dependence On Nuclear Power (VIDEO)

[caption id="attachment_14215" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Image: Goldman Environmental Prize"]Ursula Sladek[/caption]Communities around the globe are taking control of their power and switching off dirty energy to clean renewable sources instead. Here's the first in a series of posts to share these inspiring stories. One mother’s dedication can make a difference. Ursula Sladek was spurred into action after the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. A mother of five small children from Germany’s Black Forest region, Ursula was alarmed by the detected radiation in local produce and even on neighborhood playgrounds. Her concerns for her children’s health and the safety of their daily activities inspired her to seek out alternative sources of energy. Germany was, and still is, largely dependent on nuclear energy. But, the good news is that the country just last month passed a law which will close all of their nuclear plants down by 2022. Initially, Ursula focused on behavior-changing practices piloted within her own home, then spread the changes by educating her neighbors throughout the farmlands of Schoenau, a small town in Black Forest, Germany. Ursula recalls seeing her son turn off a light even with his cut finger before he was whisked away to the hospital for stitches after a run in with a kitchen knife. Conserving energy was ingrained into her children’s brains. Eventually, Ursula took her energy independence goals a step further and started installing solar panels on her own home and some others within her community. Ursula worked with her neighbors as a group to urge the local power company, KWR, to increase their renewable energy sources, but KWR wasn’t keen on the proposals and refused to budge. [caption id="attachment_14216" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Image: Goldman Environmental Prize"]EWS Power Company[/caption] So the group took matters into their own hands. They formed Schoenau Power Supply (EWS), and vied for the license to operate the power grid when KWR’s license went up for renewal in 1991. KWR requested an inflated price, but Sladek’s group raised the exorbitant purchasing cost and took the license in 1998. They even sued KWR for illegal price fixing, after the fact. Today, Schoenau Power Supply is collectively owned by 1000 citizens. Schoenau’s energy sources are 100% green, primarily hydropower, but also sourced from solar panels, wind turbines, and co-generation plants. Residents have individual units that power their own homes, but can also sell surplus energy to the grid. In total, EWS provides over 400 million KwH to 100,000+ customers. (For a quick comparison, Pepsi Bottling Group uses 426 million KWh annually) Ursula Sladek focuses on the big picture as well — she educates her customers on how to conserve energy, build their own solar plants and co-generators, and provides financial support and incentives. EWS is another inspiring example of combining community, business, and green initiative to provide a better future. Sladek’s success is a testament to the fact that huge corporations don’t always have to win, and they certainly aren’t the only answer. [youtube oz4XpBkR7tM 550]

This New Spoof Chevron Video Is Funny Because, Sadly, It's All Too True

[caption id="attachment_10568" align="alignright" width="240" caption="Click this image to go to FunnyOrDie.com and keep the video's "funny" rating at 100%."]Chevron is lame still[/caption] The hits just keep on coming! This new spoof Chevron TV ad is absolutely hilarious. It's too bad our contest is over, because this new video, created by Trouble and Maker in association with Smart Bubble Society, would have been a strong contender. Unfortunately, much of the humor falls in the "it's funny because it's true" category.

http://player.ordienetworks.com/flash/fodplayer.swf

CHEVRON is lame - watch more funny videos Chevron loves to tout its investments in renewable energies, but conveniently leaves out the fact that those investments are seriously small potatoes compared to the $26 BILLION the company plans to invest in its oil business next year. Nor does the company mention other inconvenient facts about its renewable energy projects, like the fact that the energy produced by its Project Brightfield solar plant is used to power its Kern River Heavy Oil Extraction Facility — in other words, Chevron is using solar energy to power one of the most expensive, polluting, and energy-intensive types of oil extraction around. Just as the fake Chevron PR hack says in the video, Chevron is leading the deepwater drilling charge in our post-BP oil spill world. It was recently announced that Chevron will spend $7.5 billion on one of the largest deepwater drilling projects in U.S. history. The Houston Chronicle described the project as "a massive floating city" of drilling rigs, all located about 280 miles southwest of New Orleans in the Gulf of Mexico. This is especially troubling because we're talking about Chevron, a company that was recently responsible for three oil spills in the space of one week. All of which points out just why this new video — so aptly titled "Chevron is lame" — is such brilliant satire. It's up on FunnyOrDie.com right now, and has a 100% funny rating so far. Why not click on over and help keep it that way?

Chevron's Solar Project Bulls#%t!

Rainforest Action Network is bringing back our popular web TV show Greenwash of the Week. This week our charismatic hosts Nick and Brianna investigate the recent solar announcement by oil giant Chevron, dubbed "Project Brightfield." Is it Project Brightfield or Project Bulls#%t? Let us know what you think in the comments section of this article. Stay tuned for more riveting episodes of Greenwash of the Week, sponsored by the We Can Change Chevron campaign at RAN. In the meantime, if you see an example of greenwashing that we should feature on the show, send it to us asap! You can: Don't be shy- we'd love to hear your suggestions for our next Greenwash of the Week!

Shell dumps wind and solar for agrofuels

Money speaks louder than... Oh, yeah--just about everything, including a renewable energy future or attempts to reverse climate change. In a not so surprising, yet utterly short-sighted and outdated move (circa 20th century, not new Millenium), Shell Oil has decided to abandon all their investments in renewables such as solar and wind energy, and transfer that business to what they have deemed more economically promising.  What have they decided to invest in?  Agrofuels--industrial scale biofuels. Linda Cook, Shell's executive director of gas and power, said:  "If there were renewables [which made money] we would put money into it."  She went on, "We do not expect material investment [in wind and solar] going forward." Despite an ever-growing and indisputable range of scientific evidence that links agrofuels to massive deforestation, increased food prices, and establishes that over their lifecycle, agrofuels are in many instances more greenhouse gas emitting than petroleum (i.e. climate negative), Shell has chosen to put their money where their mouth is--in an industry that at first glance appears to be a good business proposition, but will do nothing in the short or long term to combat our climate crisis, or addiction to fossil fuels. Now, more than ever, as we work to reduce our own consumption, we must also hold our government and businesses accountable to invest in the solutions and alternatives that are tried, tested and true--solutions that will turn the tide on the serious situation we all face.  Investment in real solutions are a better business proposition, and investments that harm the planet and people are a liability.  It's our job to make sure that Shell, its shareholders, and every other company out there understands this.

Wise Up Dominion!

The Beginning We woke up at 3:30 am, but few of us had slept the night before. You'd think we'd be groggy, but the adrenaline and excitement propelled us into action. By 5:30am two trucks holding steel barrels reading "good jobs, healthy communities: we deserve a clean energy future" and "prosperity without poison" pulled into the rendezvous point. My heart was pounding as I pulled a van full of concerned citizens and young activists to meet them, two more cars trailing me. A half hour later we all jumped out at the entrance to Dominion's new $1.8 Billion coal-fired power plant in Wise County VA. Within seconds we had a blockade. Nine people were connected to concrete-filled barrels, two of which donned six large solar panels illuminating the sun in the background of a large banner reading "Renewable Jobs to Renew Appalachia." Two more chained themselves to gates, keeping them closed. Our solar lit banner stretched out above the rosy smiles of visionaries young and old. It was a true privilege to work with such skilled organizers and help coordinate one of the most fluid, tight, and positive Nonviolent Direct Actions I've ever been a part of. We watched the sun rise together. CHECK OUT OUR VIDEO HERE:

Solidarity I'm not from Appalachia. I'm here because I've been deeply inspired by coal-field residents who have spent their lives standing up for clean air and water, good green jobs and a better future for their families. And it's made them subject to intense harassment and intimidation. Wise County citizens have been fighting this Dominion plant for over two years; they've spoken out at every public hearing, filed ever paper and lawsuit possible, and gotten 45,000 people to sign a "mile long" petition to the governor. And now many took the next step and invited friends from around the region and country to join them in solidarity for the first ever protest at this plant. Nonviolent Direct Action is about risking one's own personal safety for the greater good. It is an act of courage that can come with some severe consequences. That people travel from all around to support this local struggle is emblematic of the world we are fighting for - one in which we look out for one another and support each other, even when that comes at personal cost. 11 of the activists today were arrested and are currently navigating their way through the labyrinth that is the U.S. legal system. We have a prayer vigil setting up for them as I type this. Intergenerational Alongside those who chose to put their bodies on the line, came a contingent of intergenerational cheering protesters, including a nun, veterans, schoolteachers, and students. The positive energy was infectious: there was a sense of agency and empowerment shared among all of us, even as we choreographed an elaborate and potentially dangerous dance between police and Dominion employees. The action was courteous, respectful, and residents who were new to this type of action kept remarking about how it was a "class act." The words "classy," "beautiful," "reasonable," and "respectful" were constantly heard both from Wise County residents, passers-by in cars and trucks, and even the police. It's no surprise people were ready to take such a step - and to take it so seriously. Wise County has already had 25% of its historic mountain ranges destroyed forever to mountaintop removal mining. We're not just talking about saving the environment here, we're talking about cultural survival for one of the poorest regions of the country. Vision Our action was visually striking. Our banners said things like: "Rise Above Dirty Energy," "Jobs or Clean Water? We Deserve Both!" and many of us wore shirts saying "Invest in Appalachia, Don't Destroy It. Today's Destruction is not Tomorrow's Prosperity." Our positive energy and solution-oriented approach clearly had resonance, demonstrating that we were in the overwhelming majority. Most cars on the highway visibly reacted to our scene, and in a community so divided over such a controversial topic, over 85% of the reactions were enthusiastic and supportive. A record by most standards for demonstrations of any kind. Solidarity was clearly a theme of a day. Not only did people from surrounding communities come together to take a stand, but there were actions in support organized from Coast (NYC) to Coast (CA). In San Francisco more Rainforest Action Network activists infiltrated the Bank of America annual investors' conference and managed to secretly swap out Dominion CEO Thomas F. Farrell's presentation with our own - full of photos from this morning's Virginia action. It stayed up for fifteen minutes, much to his dismay. Strategy So many of us chose to engage in this action because it made good movement-sense. Beyond the campaign itself, actions like this help move the coal conversation forward - locally, regionally, and nationally, shifting the spectrum of the political debate. Local groups declared that actions like this offer them bargaining chips - upping the ante in negotiations on a wide range of coal fights, compelling other residents to action, and most importantly raising the profile and visibility of people who are often unseen in the rest of the United States. Locals sent a clear message: we will not be silent. All of this within an international context in which a recent landmark court case determined that Climate Change was so urgent that it justified breaking the law. It's only been a few hours since we left Dominion, and there is already a steady stream of media - one sure to grow as the day progresses. For such a small-town action, with the nearest media outlets over an hour away, in addition to front page articles in all the local papers, we've already had articles in: The Associated Press (AP) Wire Washington Post National Public Radio (NPR) The Richmond Times Dispatch Democracy Now! Kingsport Times News WAVY TV 10 Bristol Herald Courier Virginia News WTOP News Daily Press WJZ DC Indymedia Guerrilla News Network Mobile News Network SpinWatch WSLS 10 And that's just the beginning! This was the first action of RAN's ACTION TANK, a project to incubate new strategies for change.

Wise Up Dominion!

The Beginning We woke up at 3:30 am, but few of us had slept the night before. You'd think we'd be groggy, but the adrenaline and excitement propelled us into action. By 5:30am two trucks holding steel barrels reading "good jobs, healthy communities: we deserve a clean energy future" and "prosperity without poison" pulled into the rendezvous point. My heart was pounding as I pulled a van full of concerned citizens and young activists to meet them, two more cars trailing me. A half hour later we all jumped out at the entrance to Dominion's new $1.8 Billion coal-fired power plant in Wise County VA. Within seconds we had a blockade. Nine people were connected to concrete-filled barrels, two of which donned six large solar panels illuminating the sun in the background of a large banner reading "Renewable Jobs to Renew Appalachia." Two more chained themselves to gates, keeping them closed. Our solar lit banner stretched out above the rosy smiles of visionaries young and old. It was a true privilege to work with such skilled organizers and help coordinate one of the most fluid, tight, and positive Nonviolent Direct Actions I've ever been a part of. We watched the sun rise together. CHECK OUT OUR VIDEO HERE:

Solidarity I'm not from Appalachia. I'm here because I've been deeply inspired by coal-field residents who have spent their lives standing up for clean air and water, good green jobs and a better future for their families. And it's made them subject to intense harassment and intimidation. Wise County citizens have been fighting this Dominion plant for over two years; they've spoken out at every public hearing, filed ever paper and lawsuit possible, and gotten 45,000 people to sign a "mile long" petition to the governor. And now many took the next step and invited friends from around the region and country to join them in solidarity for the first ever protest at this plant. Nonviolent Direct Action is about risking one's own personal safety for the greater good. It is an act of courage that can come with some severe consequences. That people travel from all around to support this local struggle is emblematic of the world we are fighting for - one in which we look out for one another and support each other, even when that comes at personal cost. 11 of the activists today were arrested and are currently navigating their way through the labyrinth that is the U.S. legal system. We have a prayer vigil setting up for them as I type this. Intergenerational Alongside those who chose to put their bodies on the line, came a contingent of intergenerational cheering protesters, including a nun, veterans, schoolteachers, and students. The positive energy was infectious: there was a sense of agency and empowerment shared among all of us, even as we choreographed an elaborate and potentially dangerous dance between police and Dominion employees. The action was courteous, respectful, and residents who were new to this type of action kept remarking about how it was a "class act." The words "classy," "beautiful," "reasonable," and "respectful" were constantly heard both from Wise County residents, passers-by in cars and trucks, and even the police. It's no surprise people were ready to take such a step - and to take it so seriously. Wise County has already had 25% of its historic mountain ranges destroyed forever to mountaintop removal mining. We're not just talking about saving the environment here, we're talking about cultural survival for one of the poorest regions of the country. Vision Our action was visually striking. Our banners said things like: "Rise Above Dirty Energy," "Jobs or Clean Water? We Deserve Both!" and many of us wore shirts saying "Invest in Appalachia, Don't Destroy It. Today's Destruction is not Tomorrow's Prosperity." Our positive energy and solution-oriented approach clearly had resonance, demonstrating that we were in the overwhelming majority. Most cars on the highway visibly reacted to our scene, and in a community so divided over such a controversial topic, over 85% of the reactions were enthusiastic and supportive. A record by most standards for demonstrations of any kind. Solidarity was clearly a theme of a day. Not only did people from surrounding communities come together to take a stand, but there were actions in support organized from Coast (NYC) to Coast (CA). In San Francisco more Rainforest Action Network activists infiltrated the Bank of America annual investors' conference and managed to secretly swap out Dominion CEO Thomas F. Farrell's presentation with our own - full of photos from this morning's Virginia action. It stayed up for fifteen minutes, much to his dismay. Strategy So many of us chose to engage in this action because it made good movement-sense. Beyond the campaign itself, actions like this help move the coal conversation forward - locally, regionally, and nationally, shifting the spectrum of the political debate. Local groups declared that actions like this offer them bargaining chips - upping the ante in negotiations on a wide range of coal fights, compelling other residents to action, and most importantly raising the profile and visibility of people who are often unseen in the rest of the United States. Locals sent a clear message: we will not be silent. All of this within an international context in which a recent landmark court case determined that Climate Change was so urgent that it justified breaking the law. It's only been a few hours since we left Dominion, and there is already a steady stream of media - one sure to grow as the day progresses. For such a small-town action, with the nearest media outlets over an hour away, in addition to front page articles in all the local papers, we've already had articles in: The Associated Press (AP) Wire Washington Post National Public Radio (NPR) The Richmond Times Dispatch Democracy Now! Kingsport Times News WAVY TV 10 Bristol Herald Courier Virginia News WTOP News Daily Press WJZ DC Indymedia Guerrilla News Network Mobile News Network SpinWatch WSLS 10 And that's just the beginning! This was the first action of RAN's ACTION TANK, a project to incubate new strategies for change.

Wise Up Dominion!

The Beginning We woke up at 3:30 am, but few of us had slept the night before. You'd think we'd be groggy, but the adrenaline and excitement propelled us into action. By 5:30am two trucks holding steel barrels reading "good jobs, healthy communities: we deserve a clean energy future" and "prosperity without poison" pulled into the rendezvous point. My heart was pounding as I pulled a van full of concerned citizens and young activists to meet them, two more cars trailing me. A half hour later we all jumped out at the entrance to Dominion's new $1.8 Billion coal-fired power plant in Wise County VA. Within seconds we had a blockade. Nine people were connected to concrete-filled barrels, two of which donned six large solar panels illuminating the sun in the background of a large banner reading "Renewable Jobs to Renew Appalachia." Two more chained themselves to gates, keeping them closed. Our solar lit banner stretched out above the rosy smiles of visionaries young and old. It was a true privilege to work with such skilled organizers and help coordinate one of the most fluid, tight, and positive Nonviolent Direct Actions I've ever been a part of. We watched the sun rise together. CHECK OUT OUR VIDEO HERE:

Solidarity I'm not from Appalachia. I'm here because I've been deeply inspired by coal-field residents who have spent their lives standing up for clean air and water, good green jobs and a better future for their families. And it's made them subject to intense harassment and intimidation. Wise County citizens have been fighting this Dominion plant for over two years; they've spoken out at every public hearing, filed ever paper and lawsuit possible, and gotten 45,000 people to sign a "mile long" petition to the governor. And now many took the next step and invited friends from around the region and country to join them in solidarity for the first ever protest at this plant. Nonviolent Direct Action is about risking one's own personal safety for the greater good. It is an act of courage that can come with some severe consequences. That people travel from all around to support this local struggle is emblematic of the world we are fighting for - one in which we look out for one another and support each other, even when that comes at personal cost. 11 of the activists today were arrested and are currently navigating their way through the labyrinth that is the U.S. legal system. We have a prayer vigil setting up for them as I type this. Intergenerational Alongside those who chose to put their bodies on the line, came a contingent of intergenerational cheering protesters, including a nun, veterans, schoolteachers, and students. The positive energy was infectious: there was a sense of agency and empowerment shared among all of us, even as we choreographed an elaborate and potentially dangerous dance between police and Dominion employees. The action was courteous, respectful, and residents who were new to this type of action kept remarking about how it was a "class act." The words "classy," "beautiful," "reasonable," and "respectful" were constantly heard both from Wise County residents, passers-by in cars and trucks, and even the police. It's no surprise people were ready to take such a step - and to take it so seriously. Wise County has already had 25% of its historic mountain ranges destroyed forever to mountaintop removal mining. We're not just talking about saving the environment here, we're talking about cultural survival for one of the poorest regions of the country. Vision Our action was visually striking. Our banners said things like: "Rise Above Dirty Energy," "Jobs or Clean Water? We Deserve Both!" and many of us wore shirts saying "Invest in Appalachia, Don't Destroy It. Today's Destruction is not Tomorrow's Prosperity." Our positive energy and solution-oriented approach clearly had resonance, demonstrating that we were in the overwhelming majority. Most cars on the highway visibly reacted to our scene, and in a community so divided over such a controversial topic, over 85% of the reactions were enthusiastic and supportive. A record by most standards for demonstrations of any kind. Solidarity was clearly a theme of a day. Not only did people from surrounding communities come together to take a stand, but there were actions in support organized from Coast (NYC) to Coast (CA). In San Francisco more Rainforest Action Network activists infiltrated the Bank of America annual investors' conference and managed to secretly swap out Dominion CEO Thomas F. Farrell's presentation with our own - full of photos from this morning's Virginia action. It stayed up for fifteen minutes, much to his dismay. Strategy So many of us chose to engage in this action because it made good movement-sense. Beyond the campaign itself, actions like this help move the coal conversation forward - locally, regionally, and nationally, shifting the spectrum of the political debate. Local groups declared that actions like this offer them bargaining chips - upping the ante in negotiations on a wide range of coal fights, compelling other residents to action, and most importantly raising the profile and visibility of people who are often unseen in the rest of the United States. Locals sent a clear message: we will not be silent. All of this within an international context in which a recent landmark court case determined that Climate Change was so urgent that it justified breaking the law. It's only been a few hours since we left Dominion, and there is already a steady stream of media - one sure to grow as the day progresses. For such a small-town action, with the nearest media outlets over an hour away, in addition to front page articles in all the local papers, we've already had articles in: The Associated Press (AP) Wire Washington Post National Public Radio (NPR) The Richmond Times Dispatch Democracy Now! Kingsport Times News WAVY TV 10 Bristol Herald Courier Virginia News WTOP News Daily Press WJZ DC Indymedia Guerrilla News Network Mobile News Network SpinWatch WSLS 10 And that's just the beginning! This was the first action of RAN's ACTION TANK, a project to incubate new strategies for change.

Public Interest Groups Oppose Carbon Capture Scam

In conjunction with the international release of a report by Greenpeace today – that identifies the ridiculous risk, uncertainty and cost associated with industry-driven plans for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS),

Public interest groups (from across the country) sent the following letter to Congress, demanding that taxpayer subsidies be disallowed CCS, and that safe, affordable and market-ready energy technologies such as wind and solar be funded instead.

Dear Members of Congress

On behalf of our members and supporters we are writing to express our opposition to any policies that promote or provide taxpayer subsidies for carbon capture and storage (CCS), the practice of trapping carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion and storing it below the sea or beneath the surface of the earth.

As you know, global warming is one of the greatest challenges facing the planet today. To avoid the worst impacts of global warming scientists have warned that we need to reduce global warming pollution by at least 80 percent by 2050. Climate stabilization, national security and economic prosperity depend on substantially reducing our use of fossil fuels. That means no new investments in major infrastructure that increases fossil fuel dependence. Every dollar invested in CCS is a dollar unavailable for investment in renewable energy, efficient vehicles and energy efficiency.

CCS raises a number of serious financial, environmental and safety concerns:

· CCS cannot deliver in time. The best-case scenario is that the technology would be ready by 2030. Every decision made about new power plants today influences the energy mix for the next 30-40 years. We need to make the smartest choices to address the global warming crisis and invest in proven solutions as soon as possible.

· CCS is cost intensive. It increases the cost of power generation by 40 to 80 percent compared with conventional coal plants. Current research shows electricity generated from coal equipped with CCS will be more expensive than other less polluting sources, such as, wind power.

· CCS technology reduces the efficiency of power plants. Up to 30 percent more fossil fuel must be burned when CCS is used to achieve the same power output.

· CCS poses a risk of carbon dioxide leakage. Continuous leakage, even at very low rates, could undermine the climate benefit of CCS and large releases of carbon can also pose significant risk to human health.

As evidenced by mountain-top removal and dangerous emissions, CCS cannot make coal clean. Renewable energy sources are already available without the negative environmental impacts that are associated with fossil fuel exploitation, transport and processing. It is renewable energy together with energy efficiency and energy conservation that has to increase so that the primary cause of climate change – the burning of fossil fuels like coal, oil and gas – is stopped.

We strongly urge you to oppose any policies that provide mandates or taxpayer funded incentives for CCS. We should instead fund clean, renewable, domestic sources of energy, energy efficiency and conservation. Congress must prevent the construction of new coal-fired power plants that are inconsistent with an energy future that is good for the economy, the environment, national security, and safe for communities.

Sincerely,

ActionPA Alliance for Appalachia Appalachian Voices Black Mesa Water Coalition California Communities Against Toxics Canary Coalition Cape & Islands Self-Reliance Corporation Center for Coalfield Justice Co-op America Chesapeake Climate Action Network Citizens Action Coalition of Indiana Clean Power Now Coal River Mountain Watch Cook Inletkeeper Energy Justice Network Environmental Alliance of North Florida Environmental Research Foundation • Friends of the Earth Global Exchange The Grand Canyon Trust Green Delaware Greenpeace Heartwood Help Our Polluted Environment Indigenous Environmental Network Jefferson Action Group Kentuckians for the Commonwealth Meigs Citizen Action Now Mountain Watershed Association North Carolina Waste Awareness & Reduction Network Nuclear Information and Resource Service Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition • Palm Beach County Environmental Coalition Protect Biodiversity in Public Forests Rainforest Action Network Residents Against the Power Plant Rising Tide North America Save It Now, Glades! Save Our Cumberland Mountains Southern Energy Network Valley Watch



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