Pages tagged "human rights"


Part 3: Fashion and controversy

As the lavish display of Fall Fashion Week gets under way in New York City, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) is announcing Out of Fashion: a campaign for forest friendly fabric.

“Out of Fashion” is our latest major effort to preserve the world’s endangered forests and we need your help to win. Add your voice here. With this campaign, RAN is bringing attention to a growing global threat to forests, animals and Indigenous communities -- a threat that has been hiding in plain sight for years: dissolving pulp. Dissolving pulp is a highly influential commodity in today’s marketplace. And the increased demand for this product is accelerating deforestation and exacerbating human rights abuses across the globe.  

Big name fashion brands are complicit in the pulping of pristine forests -- seizing Indigenous land, driving species loss, and threatening the climate -- all to manufacture a product that makes its way into the clothes we wear every day.

Over the last few days, we've introduced the campaign and how and where the fiber to produce dissolving pulp comes from in our "Introducing: Out of Fashion" piece. We've discussed how and why that dissolving pulp has become attractive to clothing manufacturers in "Part Two: Dissolving Pulp and Fashion." This, our third of the three part series, outlines what fashion can do about the problem.

Part 3: Fashion and controversy

In our second blog, we talked about how clothing companies are turning forests into fashion. In order to produce rayon, viscose and other textiles, companies source fiber through the destructive and toxic production of dissolving wood pulp, buying from suppliers who have been linked with deforestation and land grabbing. When clothing companies turn a blind eye to the impact that their fabrics have on the environment, they need to know that they are putting themselves at risk. Dissolving wood pulp is responsible for the destruction of rainforests, human rights abuses, land grabbing from Indigenous communities, the loss of habitat for endangered species and large-scale climate pollution -- and it’s time for that to stop

What can the fashion industry do about this issue?

It is imperative that the fashion industry take action to clean up its act. There are clear steps that fashion companies (including famous brands like Louis Vuitton and Guess) should take in order to eliminate rainforest destruction and human rights abuses from their clothing lines.

Step One: Map the Complete Supply Chain

The first step is for companies to trace and map their supply chains. Only by clearly mapping supply chains can companies ensure that their parent or affiliated companies, as well as their vendors and suppliers, are not involved in illegal activities, rainforest destruction, and human rights abuses.

Step Two: Get a Global Policy

Companies must develop a global forest footprint policy which contains measurable and time bound targets to eliminate controversial fiber and suppliers from their supply chains. These policies need to include hard requirements for all forest fiber, including fiber they use for bags, reports, printer paper, etc. Companies need to release this policy publicly and share it with all of their supply chain partners.

It is also important to monitor and update these policies regularly ensuring that targets and timelines remain ambitious and in line with best practices. In order to successfully protect rainforests, peatlands, climate, and biodiversity; uphold human and labor rights; and eliminate controversial forest fiber, these policies -- and the common sense and environmentally responsible values that they represent --  should take center stage within companies that purchase and use forest-sourced products.

Any policy must include targets to maximize responsible fiber (like recycled content and agricultural waste) and eliminate fiber from controversial sources.

Once the policy is in place, companies need to send a strong message, and educate supply chain partners and parent companies about the controversy associated with dissolving pulp. Apparel companies should ask supply chain partners to develop and implement similar purchasing policies, and communicate with government agencies to strengthen protection for forests and human rights on a policy level.

The last step is to verify the implementation of their policy. In order to demonstrate leadership, companies should release a time bound implementation plan and report on progress on an annual basis.

Are there companies doing the right thing?

There is already momentum for change within the industry. There are some companies who have already taken steps to eliminate controversial sources from their supply chain, and some companies also have commitments to dig into their supply chains. Their initiative on this issue demonstrates that change is possible, but we need your support to push the industry forward as a whole.

Please join us in transforming the fashion industry. It’s possible to move this industry, and with your help we can take on those yet to change. Add your voice and demand that the fashion industry as a whole move beyond rainforest destruction.

 


Part 2: Dissolving pulp and fashion

As the lavish display of Fall Fashion Week gets under way in New York City, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) is announcing Out of Fashion: a campaign for forest friendly fabric.

“Out of Fashion” is our latest major effort to preserve the world’s endangered forests and we need your help to win. Add your voice here. With this campaign, RAN is bringing attention to a growing global threat to forests, animals and Indigenous communities -- a threat that has been hiding in plain sight for years: dissolving pulp.  Dissolving pulp is a highly influential commodity in today’s marketplace. And the increased demand for this product is accelerating deforestation and exacerbating human rights abuses across the globe.  

Big name fashion brands are complicit in the pulping of pristine forests -- seizing Indigenous land, driving species loss, and threatening the climate -- all to manufacture a product that makes its way into the clothes we wear every day.

Over the next few days, RAN will introduce you to this destructive industry -- and how Rainforest Action Network is planning to take it on.

Dissolving Pulp and Fashion

In our first blog, "Introducing: Out of Fashion", we introduced the threat of dissolving wood pulp and how this product makes its way out of the forest and into your closet. Dissolving pulp makes this journey disguised as rayon, viscose, and modal, fabrics used in the latest fashions from many of today’s most popular brands.

So, how do trees actually make their way into the clothes you’re wearing?

It’s a complicated process: forests are cut, then pulped into a toxic sludge or “soluble compound”. This sludge is what is known as dissolving pulp and it is produced using a wide variety of toxic chemicals including dioxin, chlorine, volatile organic compounds and adsorbable organic halides. These chemicals are known to bioaccumulate -- meaning they collect and increase in negative impact within the bodies of human beings and all living creatures. This toxic sludge is then forced through spinnerets, and becomes viscose staple fiber (VSF). The VSF is then spun into yarn, woven into fabric, sewn into garments, and then marketed by brands and sold in outlets all over the world--from luxury stores to suburban shopping malls to big box stores. That is how pristine rainforests find their way into our closets.

So, what fabrics actually contain dissolving pulp? What should you look for on the label?

This fiber goes by many names, so it’s important to check the label when looking for your next outfit. These include: rayon, viscose, Lyocell, and modal. While clothes might feel like silk or cotton, remember to double check and see if they contain rayon or these other potentially rainforest-damaging fabrics. And even if you personally are avoiding these fabrics, remember that not everybody is. That's why RAN is calling on the industry to change as a whole - and that's why we need your voice on this petition. 

Why would people actually turn precious rainforests into high-fashion apparel in the first place?

These fabrics are becoming attractive options due to the rising cost and (ironically) environmental concerns associated with cotton. Due to recent flooding and droughts, cotton crops have suffered significantly in recent years. As a response, clothing brands will even list these rainforest-destroying fabrics such as rayon  as “natural” or “renewable” textiles.

One of the most amazing things is the ubiquity of these products. From cheap clothing to high-end luxury brands, rayon and viscose are everywhere, and at every price point. Companies that use these products range from Forever 21 to Prada, from Abercrombie to Louis Vuitton--  and everyone in between. It’s critical that companies that are profiting from this destruction take responsibility for their supply chain.

In the next blog, we’ll dive into what clothing companies can do and actions you as the consumer can take to protect forests and human rights from irresponsible clothing and the expansion of the dissolving pulp market. But don’t wait - take action now to demand that your clothes are free of deforestation and human rights abuses here.


Introducing: Out of Fashion

As the lavish display of Fall Fashion Week gets under way today in New York City, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) is announcing Out of Fashion: a campaign for forest friendly fabric.

“Out of Fashion” is our latest major effort to preserve the world’s endangered forests and we need your help to win. Add your voice here. With this campaign, RAN is bringing attention to a growing global threat to forests, animals and Indigenous communities -- a threat that has been hiding in plain sight for years: dissolving pulp.  Dissolving pulp is a little-discussed yet highly influential commodity in today’s marketplace. And the increased demand for this product is accelerating deforestation and exacerbating human rights abuses across the globe.  

Big name fashion brands are complicit in the pulping of pristine forests -- seizing Indigenous land, driving species loss, and threatening the climate -- all to manufacture a product that makes its way into the clothes we wear every day.

Over the next few days, RAN will introduce you to this destructive industry -- and how Rainforest Action Network is planning to take it on.

The Context

Recently, we told you about the devastating impact that the production of wood pulp by paper giant Toba Pulp Lestari is having on the communities and forests of North Sumatra. Amazingly enough, this pulp makes its way into countless everyday products, like books, office paper and packaging.

But the production of dissolving wood pulp is an equally problematic issue.  Dissolving pulp is an ingredient found in an even wider variety of products such as cosmetics, food, household product, sanitary products -- and clothing that we wear every day.

So, wait. Trees are in my clothes?

Shockingly, yes, if you are wearing rayon, viscose, modal, or tencel.  The most prevalent type of this pulp is Rayon grade pulp, which is a core component of a textile called viscose staple fiber (VSF). This is what we’ll be focusing on, since VSF represents a large market share--and the production of VSF is responsible for 90% of the dissolving pulp expansion.

This fiber can be found in blended fabrics or on its own and it has been slowly replacing cotton as a cheaper alternative. It can also be found in polyester to create a more “high-end” feel and is present in many best selling  brands.

What are the problems with dissolving pulp?

The quest for cheaply produced dissolving pulp is leaving an incredibly destructive footprint on the globe and has been a significant driver of human rights abuses, land grabbing, natural forest conversion, the development of carbon-emitting peatlands, climate change, biodiversity loss, and toxics pollution. Every year, more than 70 million trees are turned into clothing through the dissolving pulp process. And the process is almost criminally inefficient: only 30% of tree matter is actually useable for clothing. The other 70% becomes waste. With pulp mills all over the world, including in Indonesia, Canada and Brazil, the industry is diffuse and the supply chain difficult to pin down.

One of the challenges in confronting this problem is that dissolving pulp is very difficult to trace. When we launched our campaign to eliminate rainforest destruction from books and printed materials, we could perform independent fiber testing of books to determine the species of tree and country of origin. Since the production of dissolving pulp requires a much higher toxic chemical load the trees’ DNA is virtually destroyed, making it practically impossible to pinpoint the origin of the fiber. This creates an “opaque”  supply chain, one in which the companies themselves must be active and responsible in policing to avoid contamination from conflict pulp and the timber used to produce it.

What’s next? Join us on the journey to get rainforest destruction out of fashion.

Not sure if you’re wearing rainforest destruction? Go ahead and look in your closet. And definitely have a look the next time you shop--do you see rayon or viscose on the label? Beware: you could be buying rainforest destruction.

We will be telling you more about dissolving pulp in the coming weeks and how this driver of rainforest destruction is making its way into your clothes. Join us in confronting this global threat to forests and sign the petition to send a clear message to fashion companies: We want deforestation and human rights abuses out of our clothing.

 

Ready for more? Read part two of our three part series here. 


Satire Wins

HugOWar_pepsi_v4.pngWe launched a campaign to turn up the heat on Pepsico and its use of Conflict Palm Oil. The goal has been to takeover its darkly ironic #LiveForNow advertising campaign that encourages consumption while ignoring human rights abuses, land grabs, and deforestation. Supporters like you have been doing just that by tweeting pictures from events and anywhere they spot the logo of Pepsico’s flagship brand Pepsi, calling out the truth.

Taking the heat to the next level, we launched a site highlighting the awesome pictures coming in, making it even easier to take action!

Our “#LiveForNow Shouldn’t Mean Destroying Tomorrow” site is built for people like you to use to crank up the pressure on PepsiCo. Pictures coming in from people across the US and the globe will make it clear to PepsiCo that our movement is building and we won’t stop until it ends its use of Conflict Palm Oil.

So Tweet the site! 
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Share the site on Facebook!
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Remember, take a selfie with a Pepsi sign and tweet it out with the hashtag #LiveForNow and we’ll feature you on the site too!

We know your pressure is working. PepsiCo is one of the 5 laggards companies we called out in April who have refused to take effective steps to eliminate Conflict Palm Oil, but other companies are moving. This week, palm oil laggard Conagra Foods announced a new commitment to eliminate Conflict Palm Oil. Together we can push PepsiCo to do the right thing and fix the weaknesses in its Palm Oil Commitment. So keep up the pressure! Start now by sharing our spoof site with your friends and family on Twitter and Facebook.

 


Coal is Poisoning the Cape Fear River

This month, Rainforest Action Network and three allies testified at Bank of America's annual shareholder meeting, urging them to drop coal, to stop profiting from environmental destruction and human rights abuses. We're posting the statements of our three allies. Add your voice by telling Bank of America to stop funding coal—and come clean on climate change

My name is Kemp Burdette. I am the Cape Fear Riverkeeper. I was born and raised along the Cape Fear River in southeastern North Carolina.

I want to describe to you the impacts that coal is having on the Cape Fear River, because Bank of America's financing of the coal industry, and specifically Duke Energy, is supporting the contamination of groundwater, the fouling of rivers, and the poisoning of drinking water supplies for nearly a million people in the Cape Fear watershed alone. Across North Carolina, the problem is even worse.

CapeFear_720x720I’m sure you've heard about the Dan River coal ash spill.

You may not have heard about Duke's other discharge of coal ash waste water into the Cape Fear River. Less than two months ago Duke was caught illegally pumping over 61 million gallons of coal ash wastewater into the Cape Fear River—three times more wastewater than what spilled into the Dan River.

This was done above the drinking water intakes for 840,000 people, and it was done intentionally, although secretly and illegally, with no notification of the public or of state regulators.

In addition to catastrophic failures and illegal discharges, Duke's coal ash ponds have other problems—they leak like sieves into groundwater and surface waters. They leak 24 hours a day, seven days a week at every location across North Carolina.

In New Hanover County, selenium contamination from coal ash is deforming fish in a popular fishing lake.

Duke Energy and the State of North Carolina are currently under a federal investigation for inappropriate conduct and relations between state regulators and the company.

I would urge Bank of America to end its lending and underwriting of companies like Duke Energy. Duke's coal ash ponds will continue to fail. They will continue to leak. They will continue to poison water supplies. They will continue to destroy the environment. Coal is, and will continue to be, very, very risky business.

Stand with Kemp and RAN by telling Bank of America to stop funding coal—and come clean on climate change


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