Pages tagged "cliffside power plant"


Communities Speak Out Against Coal Plants

This morning, the EPA announced limits on carbon pollution from power plants. That's a welcome step in fighting climate change—and it wouldn't have happened without communities speaking out against coal plants. Here at RAN, we're proud of the role our network of friends and activists has played in building pressure over the last several years.

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Stop TXU! Activists stage protests against financial institutions linked to Texas utility company TXU’s controversial plans to build 11 new coal-fired power plants as part of an expansion strategy that would make it the single largest corporate greenhouse gas emitter in the Unites States. Winter 2007. Photo: Andrew Stern.

 

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University of Kentucky Fossil Fools Day. Students raise a wind turbine atop a coal mound as part of an action for Fossil Fools Day at University of Kentucky. April 1, 2008.

 

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Wise Coal Action. Virginia residents and anti-coal activists form a blockade to disrupt the construction of Dominion's Wise County Coal-Fired Power Plant. September 2008.

 

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Capitol Climate Action. Thousands of activists surround the Capitol Coal Plant in Washington DC to demand its retirement. March 2009.

 

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Duke Energy's Cliffside Coal Plant. RAN activists holding a banner in front of Duke Energy's Cliffside coal plant in Cliffside, North Carolina. The banner action coincided with the release a new report, The Principle Matter: Banks, Climate & The Carbon Principles. January 2011.

 

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Crawford Coal Plant Banner. Six activists with the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization (LVEJO), Rising Tide North America, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) and the Backbone Campaign climbed the fence to Midwest Generation’s controversial Crawford coal plant in Little Village. The activists unfurled a 7' x 30' banner atop a 20-foot tall sprawling coal pile that feeds the power plant, which reads: "Close Chicago's Toxic Coal Plants." April 2011.

 

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Stand with Pat: Tell BofA to Stop Funding Coal. Grandmothers Pat Moore and Beth Henry and seven others were arrested outside of four different Bank of America branches in Charlotte, NC delivering a simple yet urgent message to the bank: they must STOP funding coal. November 2012. Photo: © Paul Corbit Brown.


Good News and Bad News on Coal

First the Good News News just came in yesterday that Duke Energy Corporation’s controversial Cliffside power plant will have to undergo a full environmental assessment of its coal-fired generator that is currently under construction in North Carolina. A federal judge ruled that Duke was in violation of the Clean Air Act for failing to adequately regulate toxic air pollution from the plant – and now has 60 days to complete a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) analysis to determine how to control mercury and other hazardous air pollutant emissions to the maximum extent possible. This is great news to the many activists who have been struggling to stop construction of this new coal fired power plant, including the Natural Resources Defense Council, Southern Environmental Law Center, Environmental Defense Fund, National Parks Conservation Association, Sierra Club and Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. This decision effectively closes a loophole that had allowed other plants to ignore pollution requirements, and we at RAN are optimistic that this ruling will help put an end to coal-power companies trampling environmental laws that exist to protect all of us – and hopefully be yet another nail in dirty coal’s coffin. Now the Bad News George Bush’s legacy is in the news a lot lately, and unfortunately the news got bad for those of us trying to stop mountain top removal coal mining. In one of his last acts before leaving office, Bush’s white house approved changes to the Stream Buffer Zone rule that will make it easier for coal companies to dump rock and dirt from mountaintop removal mining operations into nearby streams and valleys. This change undermines the Clean Water Act and will weaken environmental standards for mountain top removal mining operations. Appalachian activists have been working to stop mountaintop removal mining because of its total destruction of mountains, valleys and streams, which impact both air and water quality for nearby residents. RAN is working with our Appalachian allies to respond to this decision and we are motivated now more than ever to stop mountain top removal coal mining! -Annie

Good News and Bad News on Coal

First the Good News News just came in yesterday that Duke Energy Corporation’s controversial Cliffside power plant will have to undergo a full environmental assessment of its coal-fired generator that is currently under construction in North Carolina. A federal judge ruled that Duke was in violation of the Clean Air Act for failing to adequately regulate toxic air pollution from the plant – and now has 60 days to complete a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) analysis to determine how to control mercury and other hazardous air pollutant emissions to the maximum extent possible. This is great news to the many activists who have been struggling to stop construction of this new coal fired power plant, including the Natural Resources Defense Council, Southern Environmental Law Center, Environmental Defense Fund, National Parks Conservation Association, Sierra Club and Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. This decision effectively closes a loophole that had allowed other plants to ignore pollution requirements, and we at RAN are optimistic that this ruling will help put an end to coal-power companies trampling environmental laws that exist to protect all of us – and hopefully be yet another nail in dirty coal’s coffin. Now the Bad News George Bush’s legacy is in the news a lot lately, and unfortunately the news got bad for those of us trying to stop mountain top removal coal mining. In one of his last acts before leaving office, Bush’s white house approved changes to the Stream Buffer Zone rule that will make it easier for coal companies to dump rock and dirt from mountaintop removal mining operations into nearby streams and valleys. This change undermines the Clean Water Act and will weaken environmental standards for mountain top removal mining operations. Appalachian activists have been working to stop mountaintop removal mining because of its total destruction of mountains, valleys and streams, which impact both air and water quality for nearby residents. RAN is working with our Appalachian allies to respond to this decision and we are motivated now more than ever to stop mountain top removal coal mining! -Annie

Good News and Bad News on Coal

First the Good News News just came in yesterday that Duke Energy Corporation’s controversial Cliffside power plant will have to undergo a full environmental assessment of its coal-fired generator that is currently under construction in North Carolina. A federal judge ruled that Duke was in violation of the Clean Air Act for failing to adequately regulate toxic air pollution from the plant – and now has 60 days to complete a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) analysis to determine how to control mercury and other hazardous air pollutant emissions to the maximum extent possible. This is great news to the many activists who have been struggling to stop construction of this new coal fired power plant, including the Natural Resources Defense Council, Southern Environmental Law Center, Environmental Defense Fund, National Parks Conservation Association, Sierra Club and Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. This decision effectively closes a loophole that had allowed other plants to ignore pollution requirements, and we at RAN are optimistic that this ruling will help put an end to coal-power companies trampling environmental laws that exist to protect all of us – and hopefully be yet another nail in dirty coal’s coffin. Now the Bad News George Bush’s legacy is in the news a lot lately, and unfortunately the news got bad for those of us trying to stop mountain top removal coal mining. In one of his last acts before leaving office, Bush’s white house approved changes to the Stream Buffer Zone rule that will make it easier for coal companies to dump rock and dirt from mountaintop removal mining operations into nearby streams and valleys. This change undermines the Clean Water Act and will weaken environmental standards for mountain top removal mining operations. Appalachian activists have been working to stop mountaintop removal mining because of its total destruction of mountains, valleys and streams, which impact both air and water quality for nearby residents. RAN is working with our Appalachian allies to respond to this decision and we are motivated now more than ever to stop mountain top removal coal mining! -Annie

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