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'Corporate Colonialism' Runs Wild as 'Growth' Bulldozes Forests

As environmental group Rainforest Action Network (RAN), which has campaigned extensively on stopping the ecologically damaging palm oil expansions, has noted, the company has "recently announced its plan to expand their Indonesian palm oil plantations." This is pushing the Sumatran orangutan close to extinction as well as contributing to massive carbon dioxide-emitting slash-and-burn practices.

Common Dreams
Sunday, May 26, 2013

The Problem with Palm Oil, Part II

Reports from around the globe paint a distressing portrait of palm-oil expansion, with land disputes, violent conflicts, and even murders carried out on behalf of palm-oil barons. “It’s a modern-day gold rush,” says Laurel Sutherlin of the Rainforest Action Network, a nonprofit with one of the most active and visible campaigns against palm oil. “Especially in the last decade, there has been a meteoric rise in global demand for palm oil.

VegNews
Wednesday, May 22, 2013

The other oil import

Deforestation is at the top of the CIA’s list of environmental issues facing Indonesia, and much of it can be attributed to the creation of palm oil plantations, built to satisfy demands of the American market, which has increased the import of palm oil by 485 percent over the last decade.

Boulder Weekly
Thursday, May 16, 2013

'Follow the Money': How Rainforest Action Network Is Beating the Corporate Giants

We’ve arrived at a dangerous milestone. For the first time in human history, as Amy Goodman reported this week, "the amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has topped 400 parts per million." Climate scientiststs have warned that we should seek to stabilize emissions no higher that 350 ppm if we hope to fend off catastrophic planetary changes.

Alternet.org
Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Bank of America Meeting Dominated by Anti-Coal Activists

Bank of America (BAC_)'s annual shareholder meeting Wednesday was dominated by speeches from anti-coal activists, prompting CEO Brian Moynihan on at least one occasion to ask whether anyone had anything else to discuss.

"Anyone have a comment other than climate change?" Moynihan said as the meeting approached the two-hour mark. "Let's diversify a bit."

The Street
Thursday, May 9, 2013

Bank of America and Citigroup Biggest Lenders to Coal

Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc. (C) and JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM) were the top three financiers of the coal industry last year, according to a report today from three environmental groups.

The three banks helped underwrite bonds or loans totaling $8 billion for mountaintop removal coal-mining operations and power plants, or 38 percent of the total $20.8 billion investment for such activities last year, according to the fourth annual Coal Finance Report Card from the Rainforest Action Network, BankTrack and the Sierra Club.

Bloomberg
Monday, April 29, 2013

Palm oil under pressure

The company, like many others in the sector, is aggressively expanding to take advantage of rising demand – and Yeow says that is good for people and the economy. “We kill the competition,” he says.

But the industry also has a reputation for killing natural forests and, in the process, the animals that depend on them. As non-profit groups like Greenpeace and Rainforest Action Network (RAN) have raised awareness about the impact the industry is having on the environment, company executives say they are feeling the pressure to adopt better business practices.

Eco-Business.com
Monday, April 29, 2013

Palm Oil for the West, Exploitation for Young Workers in Malaysia

Afterward we had coffee on the veranda of the great house that overlooked the sprawling, 8,000-hectacre property, the size of a small national park. Chok stressed the importance of corporate social responsibility like a mantra and said his company spends nearly $1 million every year to take care of migrant children. In the "competition" to retain experienced workers, Chok added that doing the right thing also made good business sense. (Singapore-based Wilmar has its critics, however.

The Atlantic
Monday, April 8, 2013