Forests Newsroom

Child labor, orangutans and Thin Mints: Two renegade Girl Scouts raise questions about palm oil used in popular cookies

Girl Scouts Rhiannon Tomtishen, left, and Madison Vorva, both of Ann Arbor, have been campaigning to raise awareness of the human and environmental impact of the organization's famous cookies.

“Kids should not have to choose between selling cookies and getting to camp or choosing rainforest deforestation and orangutan extinction. There are links to slave labor as well,” Vorva said. “There should be no human rights abuses occurring in Girl Scout cookies either.”

AnnArbor.com
Sunday, April 24, 2011

Do Girl Scout Cookies Harm the Environment? Renegade Scouts Fight Against Palm Oil Ingredient

Girl Scout cookie lovers, beware. Because of palm oil, a key ingredient, those delicious and addictive treats may not be as innocent as they seem. Not only is the ingredient linked to child labor in Indonesia, but it also allegedly contributes to rainforest deforestation. But now two renegade girl scouts are lobbying the Girl Scouts of America to remove the ingredient from the cookies.

Time Newsfeed
Thursday, May 5, 2011

Four Arrested at Disney’s Burbank Headquarters in Dramatic Protest Over Rainforest Destruction

Release Date: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2011

For hi-res photos of the protest and arrest, visit ran.org/disneyphotos.

Rainforest Action Network Finds Disney Tied to Forest Destruction and Endangered Tiger Loss

Release Date: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2011

High-resolution photos available at ran.org/disneyphotos.

Statement in Solidarity with Long Teran Kenan Community in Indonesia

Release Date: 
Wednesday, April 6, 2011

San Francisco, CA - Responding to a land dispute grievance filed by the Indigenous community of Long Teran Kenan and allies including Rainforest Action Network, against palm oil giant IOI Group, the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) has ruled that IOI is in breach of the RSPO Code of Conduct. The decision is available in its entirety here:

Girl Scouts: Cookies Cut Down Rainforests

Release Date: 
Monday, March 21, 2011

Contacts:
Laurel Sutherlin, 415.246.0161
Ashley Schaeffer, 707.391.8208

Girl Scouts available for interviews upon request.

Rainforest Action Network Calls on Lead Palm Oil, Pulp and Paper Consumers to Support Indonesian Moratorium on Forest Destruction

Release Date: 
Thursday, March 3, 2011

San Francisco, CA—Days before the President of Indonesia is expected to sign a moratorium on the expansion of logging on new pulp, paper and palm oil concessions, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) has warned leading consumer companies and investors of potential shortcomings in the moratorium. A Briefing Note about the moratorium was sent to almost 100 companies including Bank of America, General Mills, Target, Staples, Gucci Group, Office Depot, Scholastic, Levi’s, Safeway, and other leading brands.
 

New Report Shows Publishing Industry Trend to Protect Rainforests; Two Leading Publishers Receive Failing Grades

Release Date: 
Thursday, November 18, 2010

San Francisco – Eleven of the nation’s largest children’s book publishers are receiving grades on their roles in rainforest protection today. In a new report and consumer guide released by the Rainforest Action Network (RAN), “Rainforest-Safe Kids' Books: How Do Publishers Stack Up?” leading book publishers are being ranked based on their paper policies and purchasing practices.

Make Black Friday Green, by keeping the trees in mind this year

Release Date: 
Thursday, November 18, 2010

San Francisco – In time for Black Friday, the biggest shopping day of the year, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) wants to help consumers make better choices about the books they buy this holiday season. A report and consumer guide released by the group called, “Rainforest-Safe Kids' Books: How Do Publishers Stack Up?” finds that publishers of popular kids’ books including Where the Wild Things Are and Baby Einstein are using paper linked to Indonesian rainforest destruction and global warming.

General Mills Ditches Dirty Palm Oil

Sinar Mas, the now notorious purveyor of palm oil, just lost another customer.

Fast Company
Thursday, September 23, 2010