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When Chevron rolled out its fancy new "We Agree" ad campaign in October 2010, we were ready for them. We had only the tiniest fraction of Chevron’s budget — the company typically spends as much as $90 million on an ad campaign like this — but we had the element of surprise, and we were determined to press our advantage.
Billionaire real estate investor and legendary tax evader Leona Helmsley famously said: “Only the little people pay taxes.” It turns out Helmsley was all too right.
Our 2011 report card examines ten banks and their financial relationships with mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia.
Rainforest Action Network believes that corporations should be allowed to extract and process mineral fuels only if they can do so without harming human health or contaminating the air, water, and soil.
Chevron rolled out a fancy new ad campaign yesterday, and we were ready for them. We had only a fraction of Chevron’s budget but we had the element of surprise, and we were determined to press our advantage.
San Francisco – Rainforest Action Network sent clean-up crews to all 10 Chevron gas stations in the city of San Francisco today, Sunday, in conjunction with 350.org’s 10/10/10 Global Work Party, which is taking place in 183 countries worldwide. The Chevron clean-up crews are highlighting the company’s unprecedented oil catastrophe in Ecuador and its continued obstruction of climate change initiatives here in California.
Two years ago no bank had a policy on coal mining, and Wall Street was providing finance and credit indiscriminately to the most destructive form of mining in the country. Bank of America, Citi, Morgan Stanley, Credit Suisse, JPMorgan Chase, and Wells Fargo have successively passed public policies limiting their financial relationships with coal operators that practice mountaintop removal (MTR) coal mining.
10 lessons communities in Ecuador have compiled from their experiences living with Chevron’s billions of gallons of oil contamination for the past 30 years.
Chevron is responsible for one of the largest environmental disasters in history. Today the oil giant is waging unprecedented public relations and lobbying campaigns to avoid having to clean up environmental and public health catastrophes that continue today.
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