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Student Action Leader Tools

Posted by 10/29/14

Our hard work truly is paying off. Just this past year we've turned the heat up and many major global corporations have committed to stop destroying forests and violating human rights for palm oil. But PepsiCo, one of the biggest globally distributed snack food companies, still refuses to adopt a truly responsible palm oil policy. That's where you come in. During the Fall 2014 semester, Student Action Leaders will play a crucial role in our efforts to cut Conflict Palm Oil from our food supply. Every year, PepsiCo pours millions of dollars into advertising its products to young people through sleek marketing campaigns like #LiveForNow and through beverage contracts and sponsorships of high school and university campuses and sports teams. PepsiCo cares deeply about what young people think of its products and because of this, students have an incredible amount of power to demand change from PepsiCo. Read more

Tell Bank of America: Don't Finance the Destruction of the Great Barrier Reef

Posted by 10/28/14

The coal industry is trying to move forward with a deal that would threaten Australia’s treasured Great Barrier Reef and turbocharge climate change—but they can’t do it without major financial backing. Three of the biggest Wall Street investment banks have said they won’t fund the deal.1 But Bank of America won’t commit to staying away. Tell Bank of America—don’t finance the destruction of the Great Barrier Reef! Right now, the coal industry is pushing an incredibly destructive plan: to build out one of the biggest coal ports in the world right in the middle of the Great Barrier Reef. A huge corporation called Adani is attempting to dredge 3 million cubic meters of seabed, wrecking part of the biggest stretch of coral reef in the world and one of the planet’s most biodiverse ecosystems.  The Great Barrier Reef...   Read more

RAN to Bank of America: Don’t Bankroll Reef Destruction

Posted by 10/28/14

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 28, 2014   contact: Claire Sandberg, claire@ran.org, 646-641-6431   RAN to Bank of America: Don’t Bankroll Reef Destruction Australian coal port threatens global climate, Great Barrier Reef   San Francisco—Rainforest Action Network (RAN) called on Bank of America to rule out financing the controversial Abbot Point coal port in Queensland, Australia, a day after three major U.S. investment banks pledged to steer clear of the project. Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, and Goldman Sachs all assured RAN in writing that they would not finance the expansion of Abbot Point, but Bank of America has so far refused to take a position. The project would significantly harm the Great Barrier Reef--construction of the new port would require dredging part of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage area--and would drive global climate change by drastically increasing carbon emissions. Earlier this year, Bank...   Read more

Tell KLK to Leave Collingwood Bay Now!

Posted by 10/22/14

This guest blog has been authored by Lester Seri of Collingwood Bay, Papua New Guinea. He is one of many local residents fiercely resisting KLK's attempted landgrab of the...   Read more

Naming Names: Forest Destroyers for Clothing

Posted by 10/16/14

A few weeks ago, RAN announced its newest campaign, Out of Fashion, a campaign for forest-friendly fabric. Currently, some of the biggest names in fashion are responsible for the pulping of pristine forests for clothing. The destruction of these forests creates a ripple effect: human rights abuses, land grabbing, habitat and biodiversity loss, climate disruption and toxics pollution. Dissolving pulp, which is spun into thread and woven into fabric, appears on clothing racks as rayon, viscose, Tencel, lyocell, and modal.  RAN is working to expose this destructive practice, and transform the supply chains of some of the most popular brands and we need your help. Are you in for a little guerrilla activism? Sign up here for your (free) stickering kit and take action to eliminate forest destruction in our clothing.  We know that it’s possible for companies to change and avoid this...  Read more

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